Casi quasi Cinema

Slide projection, foam, table and wooden trestles
122 x 100, 5 x 42 cm
2006

In August 27, 2003 the US Directorate for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict at The Pentagon hosted a screening of the film The Battle of Algiers, directed by Gillo Pontecorvo in 1966. Considering it a useful illustration in relation to the problems faced in Iraq. The flyer for the screening read:

How to win a battle against terrorism and lose the war of ideas. Children shoot soldiers at point-blank range. Women plant bombs in cafes. Soon the entire Arab population builds to a mad fervor. Sounds familiar? The French have a plan. It succeeds tactically, but fails strategically. To understand why, come to a rare showing of this film.

Which is the text projected in the model, as if would have been a model of a cinema where they potentially could have screened the film.

Casi quasi Cinema

Slide projection, foam, table and wooden trestles
122 x 100, 5 x 42 cm
2006

In August 27, 2003 the US Directorate for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict at The Pentagon hosted a screening of the film The Battle of Algiers, directed by Gillo Pontecorvo in 1966. Considering it a useful illustration in relation to the problems faced in Iraq. The flyer for the screening read:

How to win a battle against terrorism and lose the war of ideas. Children shoot soldiers at point-blank range. Women plant bombs in cafes. Soon the entire Arab population builds to a mad fervor. Sounds familiar? The French have a plan. It succeeds tactically, but fails strategically. To understand why, come to a rare showing of this film.

Which is the text projected in the model, as if would have been a model of a cinema where they potentially could have screened the film.

The Iraq Series (Unfinished)

Collage on paper
9 drawings and collages
Various dimensions
2005-2007

A series of diagram, graphs, cutout figures and traced shapes that contain references to the war in Iraq and the geo-political realities underpinning it. Both historical and visual the drawings show complexities in the reading of the war and its reasons. Combining plural reference and a critical aspect the work undermine the position of a "we against them".

The Iraq Series (Unfinished)

Collage on paper
9 drawings and collages
Various dimensions
2005-2007

A series of diagram, graphs, cutout figures and traced shapes that contain references to the war in Iraq and the geo-political realities underpinning it. Both historical and visual the drawings show complexities in the reading of the war and its reasons. Combining plural reference and a critical aspect the work undermine the position of a "we against them".

Nr 1
Rites of cooptions
(22x21,5cm)

The Iraq Series (Unfinished)

Collage on paper
9 drawings and collages
Various dimensions
2005-2007

A series of diagram, graphs, cutout figures and traced shapes that contain references to the war in Iraq and the geo-political realities underpinning it. Both historical and visual the drawings show complexities in the reading of the war and its reasons. Combining plural reference and a critical aspect the work undermine the position of a "we against them".

Nr 2
Untitled
(30 x 42 cm)

The Iraq Series (Unfinished)

Collage on paper
9 drawings and collages
Various dimensions
2005-2007

A series of diagram, graphs, cutout figures and traced shapes that contain references to the war in Iraq and the geo-political realities underpinning it. Both historical and visual the drawings show complexities in the reading of the war and its reasons. Combining plural reference and a critical aspect the work undermine the position of a "we against them".

Nr 3
Untitled
(21 x 18 cm)

The Iraq Series (Unfinished)

Collage on paper
9 drawings and collages
Various dimensions
2005-2007

A series of diagram, graphs, cutout figures and traced shapes that contain references to the war in Iraq and the geo-political realities underpinning it. Both historical and visual the drawings show complexities in the reading of the war and its reasons. Combining plural reference and a critical aspect the work undermine the position of a "we against them".

Nr 5
The distant viewer
21 x 21,5 cm

The Iraq Series (Unfinished)

Collage on paper
9 drawings and collages
Various dimensions
2005-2007

A series of diagram, graphs, cutout figures and traced shapes that contain references to the war in Iraq and the geo-political realities underpinning it. Both historical and visual the drawings show complexities in the reading of the war and its reasons. Combining plural reference and a critical aspect the work undermine the position of a "we against them".

Nr 5
Untitled
30 x 42 cm

The Iraq Series (Unfinished)

Collage on paper
9 drawings and collages
Various dimensions
2005-2007

A series of diagram, graphs, cutout figures and traced shapes that contain references to the war in Iraq and the geo-political realities underpinning it. Both historical and visual the drawings show complexities in the reading of the war and its reasons. Combining plural reference and a critical aspect the work undermine the position of a "we against them".

Nr 6
Huberts peak
21 x 29.5 cm

We Support

Single slideprojection and foamboard
31 x 27 x 13 cm
2007

We Support

Single slideprojection and foamboard
31 x 27 x 13 cm
2007

We Support

Single slideprojection and foamboard
31 x 27 x 13 cm
2007

Full Spectrum Dominance

Sun drawings
10 drawings
Each 52,5 x 67,5 cm
2008

Runo Lagomarsino's work Full Spectrum Dominance began with his reflections on slogans used by the anti-war movement in the United States. To investigate the context and historical force of these slogans, Lagomarsino juxtaposed them with quotes from other literary, theoretical and political sources. This assemblage of quotes sets up the analysis of slogans and their potentiality. Furthermore, it visually renders for the viewer how images and wor(l)ds are read through language.

The work draws its formal inspiration from early photographic technique as the drawings were produced through extended exposure to sunlight on the papers. The letters were hand-cut and placed over the paper as it was left in the sun, forming the slightest of imprints. The form of the piece thus buttresses its content, as the slow-exposure method foregrounds context, temporality and creative evolution. These abiding concerns of form and content are given ironic summation in the title, Full Spectrum Dominance, which is a military concept referring to total control of the entire spectrum of a conflict: land, air, space and information - the formal and contextual background of Lagomarsino's work.

Full spectrum dominance was one of the key concepts in the original planning for the Iraq War.

Full Spectrum Dominance

Sun drawings
10 drawings
Each 52,5 x 67,5 cm
2008

Runo Lagomarsino's work Full Spectrum Dominance began with his reflections on slogans used by the anti-war movement in the United States. To investigate the context and historical force of these slogans, Lagomarsino juxtaposed them with quotes from other literary, theoretical and political sources. This assemblage of quotes sets up the analysis of slogans and their potentiality. Furthermore, it visually renders for the viewer how images and wor(l)ds are read through language.

The work draws its formal inspiration from early photographic technique as the drawings were produced through extended exposure to sunlight on the papers. The letters were hand-cut and placed over the paper as it was left in the sun, forming the slightest of imprints. The form of the piece thus buttresses its content, as the slow-exposure method foregrounds context, temporality and creative evolution. These abiding concerns of form and content are given ironic summation in the title, Full Spectrum Dominance, which is a military concept referring to total control of the entire spectrum of a conflict: land, air, space and information - the formal and contextual background of Lagomarsino's work.

Full spectrum dominance was one of the key concepts in the original planning for the Iraq War.

Full Spectrum Dominance

Sun drawings
10 drawings
Each 52,5 x 67,5 cm
2008

Runo Lagomarsino's work Full Spectrum Dominance began with his reflections on slogans used by the anti-war movement in the United States. To investigate the context and historical force of these slogans, Lagomarsino juxtaposed them with quotes from other literary, theoretical and political sources. This assemblage of quotes sets up the analysis of slogans and their potentiality. Furthermore, it visually renders for the viewer how images and wor(l)ds are read through language.

The work draws its formal inspiration from early photographic technique as the drawings were produced through extended exposure to sunlight on the papers. The letters were hand-cut and placed over the paper as it was left in the sun, forming the slightest of imprints. The form of the piece thus buttresses its content, as the slow-exposure method foregrounds context, temporality and creative evolution. These abiding concerns of form and content are given ironic summation in the title, Full Spectrum Dominance, which is a military concept referring to total control of the entire spectrum of a conflict: land, air, space and information - the formal and contextual background of Lagomarsino's work.

Full spectrum dominance was one of the key concepts in the original planning for the Iraq War.

Full Spectrum Dominance

Sun drawings
10 drawings
Each 52,5 x 67,5 cm
2008

Runo Lagomarsino's work Full Spectrum Dominance began with his reflections on slogans used by the anti-war movement in the United States. To investigate the context and historical force of these slogans, Lagomarsino juxtaposed them with quotes from other literary, theoretical and political sources. This assemblage of quotes sets up the analysis of slogans and their potentiality. Furthermore, it visually renders for the viewer how images and wor(l)ds are read through language.

The work draws its formal inspiration from early photographic technique as the drawings were produced through extended exposure to sunlight on the papers. The letters were hand-cut and placed over the paper as it was left in the sun, forming the slightest of imprints. The form of the piece thus buttresses its content, as the slow-exposure method foregrounds context, temporality and creative evolution. These abiding concerns of form and content are given ironic summation in the title, Full Spectrum Dominance, which is a military concept referring to total control of the entire spectrum of a conflict: land, air, space and information - the formal and contextual background of Lagomarsino's work.

Full spectrum dominance was one of the key concepts in the original planning for the Iraq War.

Full Spectrum Dominance

Sun drawings
10 drawings
Each 52,5 x 67,5 cm
2008

Runo Lagomarsino's work Full Spectrum Dominance began with his reflections on slogans used by the anti-war movement in the United States. To investigate the context and historical force of these slogans, Lagomarsino juxtaposed them with quotes from other literary, theoretical and political sources. This assemblage of quotes sets up the analysis of slogans and their potentiality. Furthermore, it visually renders for the viewer how images and wor(l)ds are read through language.

The work draws its formal inspiration from early photographic technique as the drawings were produced through extended exposure to sunlight on the papers. The letters were hand-cut and placed over the paper as it was left in the sun, forming the slightest of imprints. The form of the piece thus buttresses its content, as the slow-exposure method foregrounds context, temporality and creative evolution. These abiding concerns of form and content are given ironic summation in the title, Full Spectrum Dominance, which is a military concept referring to total control of the entire spectrum of a conflict: land, air, space and information - the formal and contextual background of Lagomarsino's work.

Full spectrum dominance was one of the key concepts in the original planning for the Iraq War.

Full Spectrum Dominance

Sun drawings
10 drawings
Each 52,5 x 67,5 cm
2008

Runo Lagomarsino's work Full Spectrum Dominance began with his reflections on slogans used by the anti-war movement in the United States. To investigate the context and historical force of these slogans, Lagomarsino juxtaposed them with quotes from other literary, theoretical and political sources. This assemblage of quotes sets up the analysis of slogans and their potentiality. Furthermore, it visually renders for the viewer how images and wor(l)ds are read through language.

The work draws its formal inspiration from early photographic technique as the drawings were produced through extended exposure to sunlight on the papers. The letters were hand-cut and placed over the paper as it was left in the sun, forming the slightest of imprints. The form of the piece thus buttresses its content, as the slow-exposure method foregrounds context, temporality and creative evolution. These abiding concerns of form and content are given ironic summation in the title, Full Spectrum Dominance, which is a military concept referring to total control of the entire spectrum of a conflict: land, air, space and information - the formal and contextual background of Lagomarsino's work.

Full spectrum dominance was one of the key concepts in the original planning for the Iraq War.

Full Spectrum Dominance

Sun drawings
10 drawings
Each 52,5 x 67,5 cm
2008

Runo Lagomarsino's work Full Spectrum Dominance began with his reflections on slogans used by the anti-war movement in the United States. To investigate the context and historical force of these slogans, Lagomarsino juxtaposed them with quotes from other literary, theoretical and political sources. This assemblage of quotes sets up the analysis of slogans and their potentiality. Furthermore, it visually renders for the viewer how images and wor(l)ds are read through language.

The work draws its formal inspiration from early photographic technique as the drawings were produced through extended exposure to sunlight on the papers. The letters were hand-cut and placed over the paper as it was left in the sun, forming the slightest of imprints. The form of the piece thus buttresses its content, as the slow-exposure method foregrounds context, temporality and creative evolution. These abiding concerns of form and content are given ironic summation in the title, Full Spectrum Dominance, which is a military concept referring to total control of the entire spectrum of a conflict: land, air, space and information - the formal and contextual background of Lagomarsino's work.

Full spectrum dominance was one of the key concepts in the original planning for the Iraq War.

Full Spectrum Dominance

Sun drawings
10 drawings
Each 52,5 x 67,5 cm
2008

Runo Lagomarsino's work Full Spectrum Dominance began with his reflections on slogans used by the anti-war movement in the United States. To investigate the context and historical force of these slogans, Lagomarsino juxtaposed them with quotes from other literary, theoretical and political sources. This assemblage of quotes sets up the analysis of slogans and their potentiality. Furthermore, it visually renders for the viewer how images and wor(l)ds are read through language.

The work draws its formal inspiration from early photographic technique as the drawings were produced through extended exposure to sunlight on the papers. The letters were hand-cut and placed over the paper as it was left in the sun, forming the slightest of imprints. The form of the piece thus buttresses its content, as the slow-exposure method foregrounds context, temporality and creative evolution. These abiding concerns of form and content are given ironic summation in the title, Full Spectrum Dominance, which is a military concept referring to total control of the entire spectrum of a conflict: land, air, space and information - the formal and contextual background of Lagomarsino's work.

Full spectrum dominance was one of the key concepts in the original planning for the Iraq War.

Full Spectrum Dominance

Sun drawings
10 drawings
Each 52,5 x 67,5 cm
2008

Runo Lagomarsino's work Full Spectrum Dominance began with his reflections on slogans used by the anti-war movement in the United States. To investigate the context and historical force of these slogans, Lagomarsino juxtaposed them with quotes from other literary, theoretical and political sources. This assemblage of quotes sets up the analysis of slogans and their potentiality. Furthermore, it visually renders for the viewer how images and wor(l)ds are read through language.

The work draws its formal inspiration from early photographic technique as the drawings were produced through extended exposure to sunlight on the papers. The letters were hand-cut and placed over the paper as it was left in the sun, forming the slightest of imprints. The form of the piece thus buttresses its content, as the slow-exposure method foregrounds context, temporality and creative evolution. These abiding concerns of form and content are given ironic summation in the title, Full Spectrum Dominance, which is a military concept referring to total control of the entire spectrum of a conflict: land, air, space and information - the formal and contextual background of Lagomarsino's work.

Full spectrum dominance was one of the key concepts in the original planning for the Iraq War.

Full Spectrum Dominance

Sun drawings
10 drawings
Each 52,5 x 67,5 cm
2008

Runo Lagomarsino's work Full Spectrum Dominance began with his reflections on slogans used by the anti-war movement in the United States. To investigate the context and historical force of these slogans, Lagomarsino juxtaposed them with quotes from other literary, theoretical and political sources. This assemblage of quotes sets up the analysis of slogans and their potentiality. Furthermore, it visually renders for the viewer how images and wor(l)ds are read through language.

The work draws its formal inspiration from early photographic technique as the drawings were produced through extended exposure to sunlight on the papers. The letters were hand-cut and placed over the paper as it was left in the sun, forming the slightest of imprints. The form of the piece thus buttresses its content, as the slow-exposure method foregrounds context, temporality and creative evolution. These abiding concerns of form and content are given ironic summation in the title, Full Spectrum Dominance, which is a military concept referring to total control of the entire spectrum of a conflict: land, air, space and information - the formal and contextual background of Lagomarsino's work.

Full spectrum dominance was one of the key concepts in the original planning for the Iraq War.

Full Spectrum Dominance

Sun drawings
10 drawings
Each 52,5 x 67,5 cm
2008

Full Spectrum Dominance is a military concept with the intension of achieving dominance over the whole spectrum of a conflict, meaning operations on land, air, space and information.

It was one of the key concepts by the United States in the beginning of the war in Iraq. The work "Full Spectrum Dominance" is produced through the exposure of sunlight on the drawings.

Full Spectrum Dominance

Sun drawings
10 drawings
Each 52,5 x 67,5 cm
2008

Runo Lagomarsino's work Full Spectrum Dominance began with his reflections on slogans used by the anti-war movement in the United States. To investigate the context and historical force of these slogans, Lagomarsino juxtaposed them with quotes from other literary, theoretical and political sources. This assemblage of quotes sets up the analysis of slogans and their potentiality. Furthermore, it visually renders for the viewer how images and wor(l)ds are read through language.

The work draws its formal inspiration from early photographic technique as the drawings were produced through extended exposure to sunlight on the papers. The letters were hand-cut and placed over the paper as it was left in the sun, forming the slightest of imprints. The form of the piece thus buttresses its content, as the slow-exposure method foregrounds context, temporality and creative evolution. These abiding concerns of form and content are given ironic summation in the title, Full Spectrum Dominance, which is a military concept referring to total control of the entire spectrum of a conflict: land, air, space and information - the formal and contextual background of Lagomarsino's work.

Full spectrum dominance was one of the key concepts in the original planning for the Iraq War.

We all laughed at Christopher Columbus

Singel slideprojection on Mdf
45,5 x 25,5 x 42,5cm.
2003

We all laughed at Christopher Columbus

Singel slideprojection on Mdf
45,5 x 25,5 x 42,5cm.
2003

We all laughed at Christopher Columbus

Singel slideprojection on Mdf
45,5 x 25,5 x 42,5cm.
2003

Anticipated discoveries

Inkjet on map, prints, photography, glass, metal and wood
60 x 130 x 85 cm
2006

Some of us enjoyed underlining borders in the schoolbook with a black pencil. We did not know that to connect the drawing of maps with school time was a privilege position. Others on the other hand are forced to read and relate to maps in highly different ways. Others are forced to read maps as narratives of exclusion and fear. Others are forced to understand maps as defining who you are and who you can become.

The starting point was a meeting and an interview that I conducted with a refugee smuggler, a coyote. Simply, his work is to challenge the ways maps and nations have been constructed and regulated. He aid people to cross the borders.

The work also connects his work historically and conceptually to other historical geographers, and other narratives, for example, the link between the coyote's mapping and Amerigo Vespucio's. Arguing that his work (the coyote's) can be read as a form of contemporary geography in the legacy of historical geographers.

Anticipated discoveries

Inkjet on map, prints, photography, glass, metal and wood
60 x 130 x 85 cm
2006

Some of us enjoyed underlining borders in the schoolbook with a black pencil. We did not know that to connect the drawing of maps with school time was a privilege position. Others on the other hand are forced to read and relate to maps in highly different ways. Others are forced to read maps as narratives of exclusion and fear. Others are forced to understand maps as defining who you are and who you can become.

The starting point was a meeting and an interview that I conducted with a refugee smuggler, a coyote. Simply, his work is to challenge the ways maps and nations have been constructed and regulated. He aid people to cross the borders.

The work also connects his work historically and conceptually to other historical geographers, and other narratives, for example, the link between the coyote's mapping and Amerigo Vespucio's. Arguing that his work (the coyote's) can be read as a form of contemporary geography in the legacy of historical geographers.

Anticipated discoveries

Inkjet on map, prints, photography, glass, metal and wood
60 x 130 x 85 cm
2006

Some of us enjoyed underlining borders in the schoolbook with a black pencil. We did not know that to connect the drawing of maps with school time was a privilege position. Others on the other hand are forced to read and relate to maps in highly different ways. Others are forced to read maps as narratives of exclusion and fear. Others are forced to understand maps as defining who you are and who you can become.

The starting point was a meeting and an interview that I conducted with a refugee smuggler, a coyote. Simply, his work is to challenge the ways maps and nations have been constructed and regulated. He aid people to cross the borders.

The work also connects his work historically and conceptually to other historical geographers, and other narratives, for example, the link between the coyote's mapping and Amerigo Vespucio's. Arguing that his work (the coyote's) can be read as a form of contemporary geography in the legacy of historical geographers.

Anticipated discoveries

Inkjet on map, prints, photography, glass, metal and wood
60 x 130 x 85 cm
2006

Some of us enjoyed underlining borders in the schoolbook with a black pencil. We did not know that to connect the drawing of maps with school time was a privilege position. Others on the other hand are forced to read and relate to maps in highly different ways. Others are forced to read maps as narratives of exclusion and fear. Others are forced to understand maps as defining who you are and who you can become.

The starting point was a meeting and an interview that I conducted with a refugee smuggler, a coyote. Simply, his work is to challenge the ways maps and nations have been constructed and regulated. He aid people to cross the borders.

The work also connects his work historically and conceptually to other historical geographers, and other narratives, for example, the link between the coyote's mapping and Amerigo Vespucio's. Arguing that his work (the coyote's) can be read as a form of contemporary geography in the legacy of historical geographers.

Anticipated discoveries

Inkjet on map, prints, photography, glass, metal and wood
60 x 130 x 85 cm
2006

Some of us enjoyed underlining borders in the schoolbook with a black pencil. We did not know that to connect the drawing of maps with school time was a privilege position. Others on the other hand are forced to read and relate to maps in highly different ways. Others are forced to read maps as narratives of exclusion and fear. Others are forced to understand maps as defining who you are and who you can become.

The starting point was a meeting and an interview that I conducted with a refugee smuggler, a coyote. Simply, his work is to challenge the ways maps and nations have been constructed and regulated. He aid people to cross the borders.

The work also connects his work historically and conceptually to other historical geographers, and other narratives, for example, the link between the coyote's mapping and Amerigo Vespucio's. Arguing that his work (the coyote's) can be read as a form of contemporary geography in the legacy of historical geographers.

Anticipated discoveries

Inkjet on map, prints, photography, glass, metal and wood
60 x 130 x 85 cm
2006

Some of us enjoyed underlining borders in the schoolbook with a black pencil. We did not know that to connect the drawing of maps with school time was a privilege position. Others on the other hand are forced to read and relate to maps in highly different ways. Others are forced to read maps as narratives of exclusion and fear. Others are forced to understand maps as defining who you are and who you can become.

The starting point was a meeting and an interview that I conducted with a refugee smuggler, a coyote. Simply, his work is to challenge the ways maps and nations have been constructed and regulated. He aid people to cross the borders.

The work also connects his work historically and conceptually to other historical geographers, and other narratives, for example, the link between the coyote's mapping and Amerigo Vespucio's. Arguing that his work (the coyote's) can be read as a form of contemporary geography in the legacy of historical geographers.

Anticipated discoveries

Inkjet on map, prints, photography, glass, metal and wood
60 x 130 x 85 cm
2006

Some of us enjoyed underlining borders in the schoolbook with a black pencil. We did not know that to connect the drawing of maps with school time was a privilege position. Others on the other hand are forced to read and relate to maps in highly different ways. Others are forced to read maps as narratives of exclusion and fear. Others are forced to understand maps as defining who you are and who you can become.

The starting point was a meeting and an interview that I conducted with a refugee smuggler, a coyote. Simply, his work is to challenge the ways maps and nations have been constructed and regulated. He aid people to cross the borders.

The work also connects his work historically and conceptually to other historical geographers, and other narratives, for example, the link between the coyote's mapping and Amerigo Vespucio's. Arguing that his work (the coyote's) can be read as a form of contemporary geography in the legacy of historical geographers.

Untitled (Extended Arguments)

DVD loop, black/white, sound
2005

The work is based on documentary footage from the 1973 World Cup qualifying football match between Chile and the Soviet Union, it repeats the goal scored by the Chilenian team during the match.

What has caught Lagomarsino's attention in regards to this match is a number of things. Firstly, it took place right after the September 11 military coup, where the democratically elected Marxist President Salvador Allende was deposed, and General Pinochet installed a military dictatorship that would last for 16 years.

Secondly, it took place in the infamous Estado Nacional, a football arena in Chile's capital Santiago, where thousands of political opponents were jailed, tortured, and executed by Pinochet's junta.

Lastly, the Chilenian team played against itself, as the Soviet team boycotted the event in protest against Pinochet's regime. With no opponent, the Chilenian team "won" the match.

Untitled (Extended Arguments) is a pertinent examination of the rejection and silencing of oppositional voices and the responsibility of fellow citizens towards such silencing.

With his continuous looping of the goal, Lagomarsino illustrates the moment when all opposition has been silenced, and democratic deliberation is replaced by totalitarian monologue. Yet, the Chilenian football players play as if nothing has happened, as if their involvement has no consequence.

Untitled (Extended Arguments)

DVD loop, black/white, sound
2005

The work is based on documentary footage from the 1973 World Cup qualifying football match between Chile and the Soviet Union, it repeats the goal scored by the Chilenian team during the match.

What has caught Lagomarsino's attention in regards to this match is a number of things. Firstly, it took place right after the September 11 military coup, where the democratically elected Marxist President Salvador Allende was deposed, and General Pinochet installed a military dictatorship that would last for 16 years.

Secondly, it took place in the infamous Estado Nacional, a football arena in Chile's capital Santiago, where thousands of political opponents were jailed, tortured, and executed by Pinochet's junta.

Lastly, the Chilenian team played against itself, as the Soviet team boycotted the event in protest against Pinochet's regime. With no opponent, the Chilenian team "won" the match.

Untitled (Extended Arguments) is a pertinent examination of the rejection and silencing of oppositional voices and the responsibility of fellow citizens towards such silencing.

With his continuous looping of the goal, Lagomarsino illustrates the moment when all opposition has been silenced, and democratic deliberation is replaced by totalitarian monologue. Yet, the Chilenian football players play as if nothing has happened, as if their involvement has no consequence.

Untitled (Extended Arguments)

DVD loop, black/white, sound
2005

The work is based on documentary footage from the 1973 World Cup qualifying football match between Chile and the Soviet Union, it repeats the goal scored by the Chilenian team during the match.

What has caught Lagomarsino's attention in regards to this match is a number of things. Firstly, it took place right after the September 11 military coup, where the democratically elected Marxist President Salvador Allende was deposed, and General Pinochet installed a military dictatorship that would last for 16 years.

Secondly, it took place in the infamous Estado Nacional, a football arena in Chile's capital Santiago, where thousands of political opponents were jailed, tortured, and executed by Pinochet's junta.

Lastly, the Chilenian team played against itself, as the Soviet team boycotted the event in protest against Pinochet's regime. With no opponent, the Chilenian team "won" the match.

Untitled (Extended Arguments) is a pertinent examination of the rejection and silencing of oppositional voices and the responsibility of fellow citizens towards such silencing.

With his continuous looping of the goal, Lagomarsino illustrates the moment when all opposition has been silenced, and democratic deliberation is replaced by totalitarian monologue. Yet, the Chilenian football players play as if nothing has happened, as if their involvement has no consequence.

Notion of Conflict, Dance of the Piñata

DVD 3, 14 min
Black/White, No sound
2004

The video explores aspects of oppression and resistance through references to the piñata game.

An old Latin American game, where succession of blindfolded, stick-wielding people try to break the papier-mâché piñata figure in order to collect the candy/toys inside of it, the piñata figure has a complex history. It was allegedly brought to Italy from China by Marco Polo and later introduced to Latin America by the European colonizers, where it was used as a pedagogical tool in the "Christianization" of the "natives."

Today, the piñata has become part of popular culture and is used to celebrate special occasions such as birthdays and Christmas. In the video, the viewer sees a blindfolded male figure trying to hit a piñata figure shaped as a human body dressed in a military uniform. When he manages to hit, the strokes are brutally violent. After a couple of minutes, the video slowly fades to black, leaving the viewer to ponder what happens after.

Shot in black-and-white with no sound, the video brings to mind images and memories of the Latin American 1970s, with its many coup d'états, dictatorships, accounts of torture and killings, and resistant uprisings. However, this history is ideologically contextualized by the appropriation of the piñata figure, which simultaneously points to the era of colonization as the institutionalization of these oppressive forms of violence and the subsequent forms of resistance, cultural translation, and hybridization that were to accompany the de-colonization of Latin America.

With these dual references, Notion of Conflict, Dance of the Piñata not only raises important questions about resistance to oppression, but forces us to consider our own position in relation to this.

Notion of Conflict, Dance of the Piñata

DVD 3, 14 min
Black/White, No sound
2004

The video explores aspects of oppression and resistance through references to the piñata game.

An old Latin American game, where succession of blindfolded, stick-wielding people try to break the papier-mâché piñata figure in order to collect the candy/toys inside of it, the piñata figure has a complex history. It was allegedly brought to Italy from China by Marco Polo and later introduced to Latin America by the European colonizers, where it was used as a pedagogical tool in the "Christianization" of the "natives."

Today, the piñata has become part of popular culture and is used to celebrate special occasions such as birthdays and Christmas. In the video, the viewer sees a blindfolded male figure trying to hit a piñata figure shaped as a human body dressed in a military uniform. When he manages to hit, the strokes are brutally violent. After a couple of minutes, the video slowly fades to black, leaving the viewer to ponder what happens after.

Shot in black-and-white with no sound, the video brings to mind images and memories of the Latin American 1970s, with its many coup d'états, dictatorships, accounts of torture and killings, and resistant uprisings. However, this history is ideologically contextualized by the appropriation of the piñata figure, which simultaneously points to the era of colonization as the institutionalization of these oppressive forms of violence and the subsequent forms of resistance, cultural translation, and hybridization that were to accompany the de-colonization of Latin America.

With these dual references, Notion of Conflict, Dance of the Piñata not only raises important questions about resistance to oppression, but forces us to consider our own position in relation to this.

Histories that nothing are

DVD loop
Colour, no sound
2001-2003

In the video Histories that nothing are we see a man running holding a Molotov cocktail. The sequence is constantly repeated. The Molotov is never thrown.

It raises questions about what kind of images represent the political activist in media today, on another level it also deals with the issue about political strategies, their difference and what they can accomplish.

G-8 perdona (English is broken here)

Photography
100 x 150 cm
2006

Untitled

Photography
96 x 142 cm
2006

You taught us language and we learned to curse

Photography
variable size
2006

The works explores the violent paradox emerging from the IMF (International Monetary Fund) "forgiving" the external debt of the s.c. "Third World Countries."

europa

Photography
96 x 142 cm
2003

The visible struggle that has taken place in order to perfectly form the word "EUROPA" (EUROPE) in the piece of RunoLagomarsino includes a feeling of hopeful stubbornness, but at the same time you cannot help sensing a kind of hopelessnesstowards the meaning and the contents of the actual word. The desk becomes the place of struggle, making the word on the table seem quite abandoned.

Elena Tzotzi
From the exhibition "Go" at Liquidacion Total, Madrid

If You Don't Know What the South Is, It's Simply Because You Are From the North

Lasercut Masonite and paint
Two parts, each approximately 300 x 35 x 5 cm
SiteSpecific work for the exhibition "Ours: Democracy in the Age of Branding" at Vera List Center, New York 2008

Lagomarsino's site-specific piece is a phrase divided in two parts, installed in the bridged gap that exposes the white box gallery's ceiling and walls as theatrical gestures by revealing the rough infrastructure of the building behind. The text reads, IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT THE SOUTH IS [left wall] ITS SIMPLY BECAUSE YOU ARE FROM THE NORTH [right wall]. Taking as point of departure the assumption that communal spaces such as nations work simultaneously as forms of inclusion but also of exclusion, Lagomarsino works in the space between universalism and the post-colonial realities defining the present day. This in-between space is home to classifications and discriminations, but also to potentiality and other forms of discourse of democracy and participation. In the exhibition, that in-between space quite literally frames all other works.

If You Don't Know What the South Is, It's Simply Because You Are From the North

Lasercut Masonite and paint
Two parts, each approximately 300 x 35 x 5 cm
SiteSpecific work for the exhibition "Ours: Democracy in the Age of Branding" at Vera List Center, New York 2008

Lagomarsino's site-specific piece is a phrase divided in two parts, installed in the bridged gap that exposes the white box gallery's ceiling and walls as theatrical gestures by revealing the rough infrastructure of the building behind. The text reads, IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT THE SOUTH IS [left wall] ITS SIMPLY BECAUSE YOU ARE FROM THE NORTH [right wall]. Taking as point of departure the assumption that communal spaces such as nations work simultaneously as forms of inclusion but also of exclusion, Lagomarsino works in the space between universalism and the post-colonial realities defining the present day. This in-between space is home to classifications and discriminations, but also to potentiality and other forms of discourse of democracy and participation. In the exhibition, that in-between space quite literally frames all other works.

If You Don't Know What the South Is, It's Simply Because You Are From the North

Lasercut Masonite and paint
Two parts, each approximately 300 x 35 x 5 cm
SiteSpecific work for the exhibition "Ours: Democracy in the Age of Branding" at Vera List Center, New York 2008

Lagomarsino's site-specific piece is a phrase divided in two parts, installed in the bridged gap that exposes the white box gallery's ceiling and walls as theatrical gestures by revealing the rough infrastructure of the building behind. The text reads, IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT THE SOUTH IS [left wall] ITS SIMPLY BECAUSE YOU ARE FROM THE NORTH [right wall]. Taking as point of departure the assumption that communal spaces such as nations work simultaneously as forms of inclusion but also of exclusion, Lagomarsino works in the space between universalism and the post-colonial realities defining the present day. This in-between space is home to classifications and discriminations, but also to potentiality and other forms of discourse of democracy and participation. In the exhibition, that in-between space quite literally frames all other works.

If You Don't Know What the South Is, It's Simply Because You Are From the North

Lasercut Masonite and paint
Two parts, each approximately 300 x 35 x 5 cm
SiteSpecific work for the exhibition "Ours: Democracy in the Age of Branding" at Vera List Center, New York 2008

Lagomarsino's site-specific piece is a phrase divided in two parts, installed in the bridged gap that exposes the white box gallery's ceiling and walls as theatrical gestures by revealing the rough infrastructure of the building behind. The text reads, IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT THE SOUTH IS [left wall] ITS SIMPLY BECAUSE YOU ARE FROM THE NORTH [right wall]. Taking as point of departure the assumption that communal spaces such as nations work simultaneously as forms of inclusion but also of exclusion, Lagomarsino works in the space between universalism and the post-colonial realities defining the present day. This in-between space is home to classifications and discriminations, but also to potentiality and other forms of discourse of democracy and participation. In the exhibition, that in-between space quite literally frames all other works.

If You Don't Know What the South Is, It's Simply Because You Are From the North

Lasercut Masonite and paint
Two parts, each approximately 300 x 35 x 5 cm
SiteSpecific work for the exhibition "Ours: Democracy in the Age of Branding" at Vera List Center, New York 2008

Lagomarsino's site-specific piece is a phrase divided in two parts, installed in the bridged gap that exposes the white box gallery's ceiling and walls as theatrical gestures by revealing the rough infrastructure of the building behind. The text reads, IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT THE SOUTH IS [left wall] ITS SIMPLY BECAUSE YOU ARE FROM THE NORTH [right wall]. Taking as point of departure the assumption that communal spaces such as nations work simultaneously as forms of inclusion but also of exclusion, Lagomarsino works in the space between universalism and the post-colonial realities defining the present day. This in-between space is home to classifications and discriminations, but also to potentiality and other forms of discourse of democracy and participation. In the exhibition, that in-between space quite literally frames all other works.

Las Casas is Not a Home

Installation with photography collages, objects, sculpture, video, drawings prints and shelves
2008-2010

Las Casas is Not a Home brings together several recent works concerning Lagomarsino's analysis and re-contextualization of historical colonial discourse and attributions of language and identity. The starting point is the debate in 1550 between Bartolomé de Las Casas and Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda concerning the moral issues at stake in the Spanish Conquest of the "New World". The exhibition creates a narrative in multiple parts that unfolds the links between this fraught colonial past and its repercussions in our own equally fraught geopolitical present. This narrative, a re-examination of history presented in drawings, collages and sculptures, reflects upon how historical processes have influenced the way we read and re-read history. The title of the exhibition plays with the notion of home and of placement using the double meaning of Las Casas both as a name and also the word for homes in Spanish.

More information is available here (PDF).

Las Casas is Not a Home

Installation with photography collages, objects, sculpture, video, drawings prints and shelves
2008-2010

Las Casas is Not a Home brings together several recent works concerning Lagomarsino's analysis and re-contextualization of historical colonial discourse and attributions of language and identity. The starting point is the debate in 1550 between Bartolomé de Las Casas and Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda concerning the moral issues at stake in the Spanish Conquest of the "New World". The exhibition creates a narrative in multiple parts that unfolds the links between this fraught colonial past and its repercussions in our own equally fraught geopolitical present. This narrative, a re-examination of history presented in drawings, collages and sculptures, reflects upon how historical processes have influenced the way we read and re-read history. The title of the exhibition plays with the notion of home and of placement using the double meaning of Las Casas both as a name and also the word for homes in Spanish.

More information is available here (PDF).

Las Casas is Not a Home

Installation with photography collages, objects, sculpture, video, drawings prints and shelves
2008-2010

Las Casas is Not a Home brings together several recent works concerning Lagomarsino's analysis and re-contextualization of historical colonial discourse and attributions of language and identity. The starting point is the debate in 1550 between Bartolomé de Las Casas and Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda concerning the moral issues at stake in the Spanish Conquest of the "New World". The exhibition creates a narrative in multiple parts that unfolds the links between this fraught colonial past and its repercussions in our own equally fraught geopolitical present. This narrative, a re-examination of history presented in drawings, collages and sculptures, reflects upon how historical processes have influenced the way we read and re-read history. The title of the exhibition plays with the notion of home and of placement using the double meaning of Las Casas both as a name and also the word for homes in Spanish.

More information is available here (PDF).

Las Casas is Not a Home

Installation with photography collages, objects, sculpture, video, drawings prints and shelves
2008-2010

Las Casas is Not a Home brings together several recent works concerning Lagomarsino's analysis and re-contextualization of historical colonial discourse and attributions of language and identity. The starting point is the debate in 1550 between Bartolomé de Las Casas and Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda concerning the moral issues at stake in the Spanish Conquest of the "New World". The exhibition creates a narrative in multiple parts that unfolds the links between this fraught colonial past and its repercussions in our own equally fraught geopolitical present. This narrative, a re-examination of history presented in drawings, collages and sculptures, reflects upon how historical processes have influenced the way we read and re-read history. The title of the exhibition plays with the notion of home and of placement using the double meaning of Las Casas both as a name and also the word for homes in Spanish.

More information is available here (PDF).

Las Casas is Not a Home

Installation with photography collages, objects, sculpture, video, drawings prints and shelves
2008-2010

Las Casas is Not a Home brings together several recent works concerning Lagomarsino's analysis and re-contextualization of historical colonial discourse and attributions of language and identity. The starting point is the debate in 1550 between Bartolomé de Las Casas and Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda concerning the moral issues at stake in the Spanish Conquest of the "New World". The exhibition creates a narrative in multiple parts that unfolds the links between this fraught colonial past and its repercussions in our own equally fraught geopolitical present. This narrative, a re-examination of history presented in drawings, collages and sculptures, reflects upon how historical processes have influenced the way we read and re-read history. The title of the exhibition plays with the notion of home and of placement using the double meaning of Las Casas both as a name and also the word for homes in Spanish.

More information is available here (PDF).

Las Casas is Not a Home

Installation with photography collages, objects, sculpture, video, drawings prints and shelves
2008-2010

Las Casas is Not a Home brings together several recent works concerning Lagomarsino's analysis and re-contextualization of historical colonial discourse and attributions of language and identity. The starting point is the debate in 1550 between Bartolomé de Las Casas and Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda concerning the moral issues at stake in the Spanish Conquest of the "New World". The exhibition creates a narrative in multiple parts that unfolds the links between this fraught colonial past and its repercussions in our own equally fraught geopolitical present. This narrative, a re-examination of history presented in drawings, collages and sculptures, reflects upon how historical processes have influenced the way we read and re-read history. The title of the exhibition plays with the notion of home and of placement using the double meaning of Las Casas both as a name and also the word for homes in Spanish.

More information is available here (PDF).

Las Casas is Not a Home

Installation with photography collages, objects, sculpture, video, drawings prints and shelves
2008-2010

Las Casas is Not a Home brings together several recent works concerning Lagomarsino's analysis and re-contextualization of historical colonial discourse and attributions of language and identity. The starting point is the debate in 1550 between Bartolomé de Las Casas and Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda concerning the moral issues at stake in the Spanish Conquest of the "New World". The exhibition creates a narrative in multiple parts that unfolds the links between this fraught colonial past and its repercussions in our own equally fraught geopolitical present. This narrative, a re-examination of history presented in drawings, collages and sculptures, reflects upon how historical processes have influenced the way we read and re-read history. The title of the exhibition plays with the notion of home and of placement using the double meaning of Las Casas both as a name and also the word for homes in Spanish.

More information is available here (PDF).

Las Casas is Not a Home

Installation with photography collages, objects, sculpture, video, drawings prints and shelves
2008-2010

Las Casas is Not a Home brings together several recent works concerning Lagomarsino's analysis and re-contextualization of historical colonial discourse and attributions of language and identity. The starting point is the debate in 1550 between Bartolomé de Las Casas and Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda concerning the moral issues at stake in the Spanish Conquest of the "New World". The exhibition creates a narrative in multiple parts that unfolds the links between this fraught colonial past and its repercussions in our own equally fraught geopolitical present. This narrative, a re-examination of history presented in drawings, collages and sculptures, reflects upon how historical processes have influenced the way we read and re-read history. The title of the exhibition plays with the notion of home and of placement using the double meaning of Las Casas both as a name and also the word for homes in Spanish.

More information is available here (PDF).

Las Casas is Not a Home

Installation with photography collages, objects, sculpture, video, drawings prints and shelves
2008-2010

Las Casas is Not a Home brings together several recent works concerning Lagomarsino's analysis and re-contextualization of historical colonial discourse and attributions of language and identity. The starting point is the debate in 1550 between Bartolomé de Las Casas and Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda concerning the moral issues at stake in the Spanish Conquest of the "New World". The exhibition creates a narrative in multiple parts that unfolds the links between this fraught colonial past and its repercussions in our own equally fraught geopolitical present. This narrative, a re-examination of history presented in drawings, collages and sculptures, reflects upon how historical processes have influenced the way we read and re-read history. The title of the exhibition plays with the notion of home and of placement using the double meaning of Las Casas both as a name and also the word for homes in Spanish.

More information is available here (PDF).

Horizon (Southern Sun Drawing)

Sundrawing on newsprint, 90 drawings, each 18 x 10 cm
2010

The drawings were made by covering a thin line in the middle of the paper creating a line which could be interpreted as a horizon.

The papers are then put against the sun in the window of the studio for several weeks.

As the sun burns, the paper turns yellow except for the covered "horizon".

For more information, click here (PDF).

Horizon (Southern Sun Drawing)

Sundrawing on newsprint, 90 drawings, each 18 x 10 cm
2010

The drawings were made by covering a thin line in the middle of the paper creating a line which could be interpreted as a horizon.

The papers are then put against the sun in the window of the studio for several weeks.

As the sun burns, the paper turns yellow except for the covered "horizon".

For more information, click here (PDF).

Horizon (Southern Sun Drawing)

Sundrawing on newsprint, 90 drawings, each 18 x 10 cm
2010

The drawings were made by covering a thin line in the middle of the paper creating a line which could be interpreted as a horizon.

The papers are then put against the sun in the window of the studio for several weeks.

As the sun burns, the paper turns yellow except for the covered "horizon".

For more information, click here (PDF).

The G in Modernity Stands for Ghosts

HD transferred to DVD
5:19 min
2009

In the video The G in Modernity Stands for Ghosts (2009), crumpled pieces of paper in a small cardboard box are lit with a match. The balls of paper are blank, undiscovered areas Lagomarsino cut out of an atlas. The film ends with them carbonizing completely, but, shown as a loop, the action of the burning begins over.

The sequence shows a symbolic act of destruction but also of return: the small box becomes an open coffin that holds the terrae incognitae of the world, which are repeatedly ignited anew. The image of smoke and fire is also connected with the manifestations of ghosts, as the title of the film suggests.

The G in Modernity Stands for Ghosts

HD transferred to DVD
5:19 min
2009

In the video The G in Modernity Stands for Ghosts (2009), crumpled pieces of paper in a small cardboard box are lit with a match. The balls of paper are blank, undiscovered areas Lagomarsino cut out of an atlas. The film ends with them carbonizing completely, but, shown as a loop, the action of the burning begins over.

The sequence shows a symbolic act of destruction but also of return: the small box becomes an open coffin that holds the terrae incognitae of the world, which are repeatedly ignited anew. The image of smoke and fire is also connected with the manifestations of ghosts, as the title of the film suggests.

The G in Modernity Stands for Ghosts

HD transferred to DVD
5:19 min
2009

In the video The G in Modernity Stands for Ghosts (2009), crumpled pieces of paper in a small cardboard box are lit with a match. The balls of paper are blank, undiscovered areas Lagomarsino cut out of an atlas. The film ends with them carbonizing completely, but, shown as a loop, the action of the burning begins over.

The sequence shows a symbolic act of destruction but also of return: the small box becomes an open coffin that holds the terrae incognitae of the world, which are repeatedly ignited anew. The image of smoke and fire is also connected with the manifestations of ghosts, as the title of the film suggests.

The G in Modernity Stands for Ghosts

HD transferred to DVD
5:19 min
2009

In the video The G in Modernity Stands for Ghosts (2009), crumpled pieces of paper in a small cardboard box are lit with a match. The balls of paper are blank, undiscovered areas Lagomarsino cut out of an atlas. The film ends with them carbonizing completely, but, shown as a loop, the action of the burning begins over.

The sequence shows a symbolic act of destruction but also of return: the small box becomes an open coffin that holds the terrae incognitae of the world, which are repeatedly ignited anew. The image of smoke and fire is also connected with the manifestations of ghosts, as the title of the film suggests.

A Conquest Means Not Only Taking Over (II)

Installation with wallpaper, drawings, photographs and objects
2010

The expeditions of Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador who conquered the Incan Empire in the beginning of the 16th century in his search for gold and glory, occupy an indisputable position in our history books. A not so well-known fact however, is that Pizarro could neither read nor write. His signature consisted of two squiggles, each time confirmed by a notary public who signed in between. This abstract sign, almost a drawing, is the signature of power that sanctioned acts of violence and oppression altering the future of both the "New" and the "Old World".

Through an intricate arrangement of loose associations, symbolic fragments and historical facts Runo Lagomarsino traces out the double-edged relationship between modernity and colonialism, and its consequences on our times. The advocates of colonization once argued for their God-given duty to impose universal values (in this case through Catholicism) in order to salvage the native people. Later on when freedom, democracy, and reason (religious tolerance included) were introduced through the Enlightenment as primary values of society, another set of power games and destruction was triggered. Disparate forms of endless exploitation lead up to societies of today burdened with unresolved problems that haunt us like ghosts from our past.

Observing this movement of history how is it then, if at all, possible to break with the vicious circle of repetitive injustices? To revisit and examine historical experiences in order to understand the aims and interests that lie behind them is perhaps one way. Another is to continuously keep asking ourselves who are "we" and what do we in fact "support"?

A Conquest Means Not Only Taking Over (II)

Installation with wallpaper, drawings, photographs and objects
2010

The expeditions of Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador who conquered the Incan Empire in the beginning of the 16th century in his search for gold and glory, occupy an indisputable position in our history books. A not so well-known fact however, is that Pizarro could neither read nor write. His signature consisted of two squiggles, each time confirmed by a notary public who signed in between. This abstract sign, almost a drawing, is the signature of power that sanctioned acts of violence and oppression altering the future of both the "New" and the "Old World".

Through an intricate arrangement of loose associations, symbolic fragments and historical facts Runo Lagomarsino traces out the double-edged relationship between modernity and colonialism, and its consequences on our times. The advocates of colonization once argued for their God-given duty to impose universal values (in this case through Catholicism) in order to salvage the native people. Later on when freedom, democracy, and reason (religious tolerance included) were introduced through the Enlightenment as primary values of society, another set of power games and destruction was triggered. Disparate forms of endless exploitation lead up to societies of today burdened with unresolved problems that haunt us like ghosts from our past.

Observing this movement of history how is it then, if at all, possible to break with the vicious circle of repetitive injustices? To revisit and examine historical experiences in order to understand the aims and interests that lie behind them is perhaps one way. Another is to continuously keep asking ourselves who are "we" and what do we in fact "support"?

A Conquest Means Not Only Taking Over (II)

Installation with wallpaper, drawings, photographs and objects
2010

The expeditions of Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador who conquered the Incan Empire in the beginning of the 16th century in his search for gold and glory, occupy an indisputable position in our history books. A not so well-known fact however, is that Pizarro could neither read nor write. His signature consisted of two squiggles, each time confirmed by a notary public who signed in between. This abstract sign, almost a drawing, is the signature of power that sanctioned acts of violence and oppression altering the future of both the "New" and the "Old World".

Through an intricate arrangement of loose associations, symbolic fragments and historical facts Runo Lagomarsino traces out the double-edged relationship between modernity and colonialism, and its consequences on our times. The advocates of colonization once argued for their God-given duty to impose universal values (in this case through Catholicism) in order to salvage the native people. Later on when freedom, democracy, and reason (religious tolerance included) were introduced through the Enlightenment as primary values of society, another set of power games and destruction was triggered. Disparate forms of endless exploitation lead up to societies of today burdened with unresolved problems that haunt us like ghosts from our past.

Observing this movement of history how is it then, if at all, possible to break with the vicious circle of repetitive injustices? To revisit and examine historical experiences in order to understand the aims and interests that lie behind them is perhaps one way. Another is to continuously keep asking ourselves who are "we" and what do we in fact "support"?

A Conquest Means Not Only Taking Over (II)

Installation with wallpaper, drawings, photographs and objects
2010

The expeditions of Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador who conquered the Incan Empire in the beginning of the 16th century in his search for gold and glory, occupy an indisputable position in our history books. A not so well-known fact however, is that Pizarro could neither read nor write. His signature consisted of two squiggles, each time confirmed by a notary public who signed in between. This abstract sign, almost a drawing, is the signature of power that sanctioned acts of violence and oppression altering the future of both the "New" and the "Old World".

Through an intricate arrangement of loose associations, symbolic fragments and historical facts Runo Lagomarsino traces out the double-edged relationship between modernity and colonialism, and its consequences on our times. The advocates of colonization once argued for their God-given duty to impose universal values (in this case through Catholicism) in order to salvage the native people. Later on when freedom, democracy, and reason (religious tolerance included) were introduced through the Enlightenment as primary values of society, another set of power games and destruction was triggered. Disparate forms of endless exploitation lead up to societies of today burdened with unresolved problems that haunt us like ghosts from our past.

Observing this movement of history how is it then, if at all, possible to break with the vicious circle of repetitive injustices? To revisit and examine historical experiences in order to understand the aims and interests that lie behind them is perhaps one way. Another is to continuously keep asking ourselves who are "we" and what do we in fact "support"?

A Conquest Means Not Only Taking Over (II)

Installation with wallpaper, drawings, photographs and objects
2010

The expeditions of Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador who conquered the Incan Empire in the beginning of the 16th century in his search for gold and glory, occupy an indisputable position in our history books. A not so well-known fact however, is that Pizarro could neither read nor write. His signature consisted of two squiggles, each time confirmed by a notary public who signed in between. This abstract sign, almost a drawing, is the signature of power that sanctioned acts of violence and oppression altering the future of both the "New" and the "Old World".

Through an intricate arrangement of loose associations, symbolic fragments and historical facts Runo Lagomarsino traces out the double-edged relationship between modernity and colonialism, and its consequences on our times. The advocates of colonization once argued for their God-given duty to impose universal values (in this case through Catholicism) in order to salvage the native people. Later on when freedom, democracy, and reason (religious tolerance included) were introduced through the Enlightenment as primary values of society, another set of power games and destruction was triggered. Disparate forms of endless exploitation lead up to societies of today burdened with unresolved problems that haunt us like ghosts from our past.

Observing this movement of history how is it then, if at all, possible to break with the vicious circle of repetitive injustices? To revisit and examine historical experiences in order to understand the aims and interests that lie behind them is perhaps one way. Another is to continuously keep asking ourselves who are "we" and what do we in fact "support"?

A Conquest Means Not Only Taking Over (II)

Installation with wallpaper, drawings, photographs and objects
2010

The expeditions of Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador who conquered the Incan Empire in the beginning of the 16th century in his search for gold and glory, occupy an indisputable position in our history books. A not so well-known fact however, is that Pizarro could neither read nor write. His signature consisted of two squiggles, each time confirmed by a notary public who signed in between. This abstract sign, almost a drawing, is the signature of power that sanctioned acts of violence and oppression altering the future of both the "New" and the "Old World".

Through an intricate arrangement of loose associations, symbolic fragments and historical facts Runo Lagomarsino traces out the double-edged relationship between modernity and colonialism, and its consequences on our times. The advocates of colonization once argued for their God-given duty to impose universal values (in this case through Catholicism) in order to salvage the native people. Later on when freedom, democracy, and reason (religious tolerance included) were introduced through the Enlightenment as primary values of society, another set of power games and destruction was triggered. Disparate forms of endless exploitation lead up to societies of today burdened with unresolved problems that haunt us like ghosts from our past.

Observing this movement of history how is it then, if at all, possible to break with the vicious circle of repetitive injustices? To revisit and examine historical experiences in order to understand the aims and interests that lie behind them is perhaps one way. Another is to continuously keep asking ourselves who are "we" and what do we in fact "support"?

A Conquest Means Not Only Taking Over (II)

Installation with wallpaper, drawings, photographs and objects
5:19 min
2010

The expeditions of Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador who conquered the Incan Empire in the beginning of the 16th century in his search for gold and glory, occupy an indisputable position in our history books. A not so well-known fact however, is that Pizarro could neither read nor write. His signature consisted of two squiggles, each time confirmed by a notary public who signed in between. This abstract sign, almost a drawing, is the signature of power that sanctioned acts of violence and oppression altering the future of both the "New" and the "Old World".

Through an intricate arrangement of loose associations, symbolic fragments and historical facts Runo Lagomarsino traces out the double-edged relationship between modernity and colonialism, and its consequences on our times. The advocates of colonization once argued for their God-given duty to impose universal values (in this case through Catholicism) in order to salvage the native people. Later on when freedom, democracy, and reason (religious tolerance included) were introduced through the Enlightenment as primary values of society, another set of power games and destruction was triggered. Disparate forms of endless exploitation lead up to societies of today burdened with unresolved problems that haunt us like ghosts from our past.

Observing this movement of history how is it then, if at all, possible to break with the vicious circle of repetitive injustices? To revisit and examine historical experiences in order to understand the aims and interests that lie behind them is perhaps one way. Another is to continuously keep asking ourselves who are "we" and what do we in fact "support"?

A Conquest Means Not Only Taking Over (II)

Installation with wallpaper, drawings, photographs and objects
5:19 min
2010

The expeditions of Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador who conquered the Incan Empire in the beginning of the 16th century in his search for gold and glory, occupy an indisputable position in our history books. A not so well-known fact however, is that Pizarro could neither read nor write. His signature consisted of two squiggles, each time confirmed by a notary public who signed in between. This abstract sign, almost a drawing, is the signature of power that sanctioned acts of violence and oppression altering the future of both the "New" and the "Old World".

Through an intricate arrangement of loose associations, symbolic fragments and historical facts Runo Lagomarsino traces out the double-edged relationship between modernity and colonialism, and its consequences on our times. The advocates of colonization once argued for their God-given duty to impose universal values (in this case through Catholicism) in order to salvage the native people. Later on when freedom, democracy, and reason (religious tolerance included) were introduced through the Enlightenment as primary values of society, another set of power games and destruction was triggered. Disparate forms of endless exploitation lead up to societies of today burdened with unresolved problems that haunt us like ghosts from our past.

Observing this movement of history how is it then, if at all, possible to break with the vicious circle of repetitive injustices? To revisit and examine historical experiences in order to understand the aims and interests that lie behind them is perhaps one way. Another is to continuously keep asking ourselves who are "we" and what do we in fact "support"?

A Conquest Means Not Only Taking Over (II)

Installation with wallpaper, drawings, photographs and objects
5:19 min
2010

The expeditions of Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador who conquered the Incan Empire in the beginning of the 16th century in his search for gold and glory, occupy an indisputable position in our history books. A not so well-known fact however, is that Pizarro could neither read nor write. His signature consisted of two squiggles, each time confirmed by a notary public who signed in between. This abstract sign, almost a drawing, is the signature of power that sanctioned acts of violence and oppression altering the future of both the "New" and the "Old World".

Through an intricate arrangement of loose associations, symbolic fragments and historical facts Runo Lagomarsino traces out the double-edged relationship between modernity and colonialism, and its consequences on our times. The advocates of colonization once argued for their God-given duty to impose universal values (in this case through Catholicism) in order to salvage the native people. Later on when freedom, democracy, and reason (religious tolerance included) were introduced through the Enlightenment as primary values of society, another set of power games and destruction was triggered. Disparate forms of endless exploitation lead up to societies of today burdened with unresolved problems that haunt us like ghosts from our past.

Observing this movement of history how is it then, if at all, possible to break with the vicious circle of repetitive injustices? To revisit and examine historical experiences in order to understand the aims and interests that lie behind them is perhaps one way. Another is to continuously keep asking ourselves who are "we" and what do we in fact "support"?

A Conquest Means Not Only Taking Over (II)

Installation with wallpaper, drawings, photographs and objects
5:19 min
2010

The expeditions of Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador who conquered the Incan Empire in the beginning of the 16th century in his search for gold and glory, occupy an indisputable position in our history books. A not so well-known fact however, is that Pizarro could neither read nor write. His signature consisted of two squiggles, each time confirmed by a notary public who signed in between. This abstract sign, almost a drawing, is the signature of power that sanctioned acts of violence and oppression altering the future of both the "New" and the "Old World".

Through an intricate arrangement of loose associations, symbolic fragments and historical facts Runo Lagomarsino traces out the double-edged relationship between modernity and colonialism, and its consequences on our times. The advocates of colonization once argued for their God-given duty to impose universal values (in this case through Catholicism) in order to salvage the native people. Later on when freedom, democracy, and reason (religious tolerance included) were introduced through the Enlightenment as primary values of society, another set of power games and destruction was triggered. Disparate forms of endless exploitation lead up to societies of today burdened with unresolved problems that haunt us like ghosts from our past.

Observing this movement of history how is it then, if at all, possible to break with the vicious circle of repetitive injustices? To revisit and examine historical experiences in order to understand the aims and interests that lie behind them is perhaps one way. Another is to continuously keep asking ourselves who are "we" and what do we in fact "support"?

ContraTiempos

2010

Dia projection loop, 27 original images in a Kodak slide projection carousel with timer, variable projection size.

ContraTiempos (Model)

2010 - 11

Wood, metal, lamp and stones, 58.5 x 144 x 219 cm

ContraTiempos

2010

Dia projection loop, 27 original images in a Kodak slide projection carousel with timer, variable projection size.

ContraTiempos (Model)

2010 - 11

Wood, metal, lamp and stones, 58.5 x 144 x 219 cm

ContraTiempos

2010

Dia projection loop, 27 original images in a Kodak slide projection carousel with timer, variable projection size.

ContraTiempos (Model)

2010 - 11

Wood, metal, lamp and stones, 58.5 x 144 x 219 cm

ContraTiempos

2010

Dia projection loop, 27 original images in a Kodak slide projection carousel with timer, variable projection size.

ContraTiempos

2010

Dia projection loop, 27 original images in a Kodak slide projection carousel with timer, variable projection size.

ContraTiempos

2010

Dia projection loop, 27 original images in a Kodak slide projection carousel with timer, variable projection size.

Trans Atlantic

32 sundrawings and 17 unrealized sundrawings, newsprint paper, 33 x 47,5 cm each
2010-11

For the work Trans Atlantic (2010/11). The artist arranged for a set of newsprint papers to travel across the Atlantic Ocean with a solo sailor. During the journey the paper was exposed to the sun and thereby burned by it. In this way the sheets transformed from "unmarked" surfaces into "unique" pieces of narration.

Trans Atlantic expands and further develops the artist's earlier works Full Spectrum Dominance (2008) and Horizon (Southern Sun Drawing) (2010), using the sun both as a source of production and a metaphorical voice-over.

The process of the paper's voyage explores the transformation of materiality through time and geography. The work thus illuminates the idea of the journey across the Atlantic (with all its historical connotations) both as embodied experience and as symbolic meaning.

What is the relationship between material and voice(s)? In what ways and through what kind of bodies does materiality speak?

For more information, see this PDF document

Trans Atlantic

32 sundrawings and 17 unrealized sundrawings, newsprint paper, 33 x 47,5 cm each
2010-11

For the work Trans Atlantic (2010/11). The artist arranged for a set of newsprint papers to travel across the Atlantic Ocean with a solo sailor. During the journey the paper was exposed to the sun and thereby burned by it. In this way the sheets transformed from "unmarked" surfaces into "unique" pieces of narration.

Trans Atlantic expands and further develops the artist's earlier works Full Spectrum Dominance (2008) and Horizon (Southern Sun Drawing) (2010), using the sun both as a source of production and a metaphorical voice-over.

The process of the paper's voyage explores the transformation of materiality through time and geography. The work thus illuminates the idea of the journey across the Atlantic (with all its historical connotations) both as embodied experience and as symbolic meaning.

What is the relationship between material and voice(s)? In what ways and through what kind of bodies does materiality speak?

For more information, see this PDF document

Trans Atlantic

32 sundrawings and 17 unrealized sundrawings, newsprint paper, 33 x 47,5 cm each
2010-11

For the work Trans Atlantic (2010/11). The artist arranged for a set of newsprint papers to travel across the Atlantic Ocean with a solo sailor. During the journey the paper was exposed to the sun and thereby burned by it. In this way the sheets transformed from "unmarked" surfaces into "unique" pieces of narration.

Trans Atlantic expands and further develops the artist's earlier works Full Spectrum Dominance (2008) and Horizon (Southern Sun Drawing) (2010), using the sun both as a source of production and a metaphorical voice-over.

The process of the paper's voyage explores the transformation of materiality through time and geography. The work thus illuminates the idea of the journey across the Atlantic (with all its historical connotations) both as embodied experience and as symbolic meaning.

What is the relationship between material and voice(s)? In what ways and through what kind of bodies does materiality speak?

For more information, see this PDF document

Trans Atlantic

32 sundrawings and 17 unrealized sundrawings, newsprint paper, 33 x 47,5 cm each
2010-11

For the work Trans Atlantic (2010/11). The artist arranged for a set of newsprint papers to travel across the Atlantic Ocean with a solo sailor. During the journey the paper was exposed to the sun and thereby burned by it. In this way the sheets transformed from "unmarked" surfaces into "unique" pieces of narration.

Trans Atlantic expands and further develops the artist's earlier works Full Spectrum Dominance (2008) and Horizon (Southern Sun Drawing) (2010), using the sun both as a source of production and a metaphorical voice-over.

The process of the paper's voyage explores the transformation of materiality through time and geography. The work thus illuminates the idea of the journey across the Atlantic (with all its historical connotations) both as embodied experience and as symbolic meaning.

What is the relationship between material and voice(s)? In what ways and through what kind of bodies does materiality speak?

For more information, see this PDF document

Trans Atlantic

32 sundrawings and 17 unrealized sundrawings, newsprint paper, 33 x 47,5 cm each
2010-11

For the work Trans Atlantic (2010/11). The artist arranged for a set of newsprint papers to travel across the Atlantic Ocean with a solo sailor. During the journey the paper was exposed to the sun and thereby burned by it. In this way the sheets transformed from "unmarked" surfaces into "unique" pieces of narration.

Trans Atlantic expands and further develops the artist's earlier works Full Spectrum Dominance (2008) and Horizon (Southern Sun Drawing) (2010), using the sun both as a source of production and a metaphorical voice-over.

The process of the paper's voyage explores the transformation of materiality through time and geography. The work thus illuminates the idea of the journey across the Atlantic (with all its historical connotations) both as embodied experience and as symbolic meaning.

What is the relationship between material and voice(s)? In what ways and through what kind of bodies does materiality speak?

For more information, see this PDF document

Trans Atlantic

32 sundrawings and 17 unrealized sundrawings, newsprint paper, 33 x 47,5 cm each
2010-11

For the work Trans Atlantic (2010/11). The artist arranged for a set of newsprint papers to travel across the Atlantic Ocean with a solo sailor. During the journey the paper was exposed to the sun and thereby burned by it. In this way the sheets transformed from "unmarked" surfaces into "unique" pieces of narration.

Trans Atlantic expands and further develops the artist's earlier works Full Spectrum Dominance (2008) and Horizon (Southern Sun Drawing) (2010), using the sun both as a source of production and a metaphorical voice-over.

The process of the paper's voyage explores the transformation of materiality through time and geography. The work thus illuminates the idea of the journey across the Atlantic (with all its historical connotations) both as embodied experience and as symbolic meaning.

What is the relationship between material and voice(s)? In what ways and through what kind of bodies does materiality speak?

For more information, see this PDF document

Trans Atlantic

32 sundrawings and 17 unrealized sundrawings, newsprint paper, 33 x 47,5 cm each
2010-11

For the work Trans Atlantic (2010/11). The artist arranged for a set of newsprint papers to travel across the Atlantic Ocean with a solo sailor. During the journey the paper was exposed to the sun and thereby burned by it. In this way the sheets transformed from "unmarked" surfaces into "unique" pieces of narration.

Trans Atlantic expands and further develops the artist's earlier works Full Spectrum Dominance (2008) and Horizon (Southern Sun Drawing) (2010), using the sun both as a source of production and a metaphorical voice-over.

The process of the paper's voyage explores the transformation of materiality through time and geography. The work thus illuminates the idea of the journey across the Atlantic (with all its historical connotations) both as embodied experience and as symbolic meaning.

What is the relationship between material and voice(s)? In what ways and through what kind of bodies does materiality speak?

For more information, see this PDF document

OtherWhere

2011

168 postcards and stones, 6 painted wood tables, 100 x 133 x 59 cm

In the centre of the gallery six tables display several postcards of national commercial airlines. The depicted airplanes are from different parts of the world and time periods. There are postcards from companies that for one reason or another have ceased to operate, including those from countries that don't exist anymore or have changed their name. On each of the postcards there is a line of pebbles placed side by side. As the original airplanes once did or still do and as the postcards were designed to do, the stones have also been travelling, in a conjunction of a metaphoric travelling and an actual one. The stones have been collected in different locations, during walks taken by the artist or by friends and colleagues who contributed to the collection, building a collective narrative of travel, displacement and people.

The artist has meticulously positioned the stones to cover the aircrafts' windows. All the windows are covered, not letting the passengers look out or the viewers look in. It is the stones that hold the airplane on the table, forcing each of them to stay, preventing them to fly. There is a visual paradox between the physicality of the stones and the postcards, and the nature of the aircrafts they represent. Planes belonging to nations, stones belonging to places, people in between placement and displacement, transcending notions of national belonging by the act of collecting stones everywhere.

OtherWhere

2011

168 postcards and stones, 6 painted wood tables, 100 x 133 x 59 cm

In the centre of the gallery six tables display several postcards of national commercial airlines. The depicted airplanes are from different parts of the world and time periods. There are postcards from companies that for one reason or another have ceased to operate, including those from countries that don't exist anymore or have changed their name. On each of the postcards there is a line of pebbles placed side by side. As the original airplanes once did or still do and as the postcards were designed to do, the stones have also been travelling, in a conjunction of a metaphoric travelling and an actual one. The stones have been collected in different locations, during walks taken by the artist or by friends and colleagues who contributed to the collection, building a collective narrative of travel, displacement and people.

The artist has meticulously positioned the stones to cover the aircrafts' windows. All the windows are covered, not letting the passengers look out or the viewers look in. It is the stones that hold the airplane on the table, forcing each of them to stay, preventing them to fly. There is a visual paradox between the physicality of the stones and the postcards, and the nature of the aircrafts they represent. Planes belonging to nations, stones belonging to places, people in between placement and displacement, transcending notions of national belonging by the act of collecting stones everywhere.

OtherWhere

2011

168 postcards and stones, 6 painted wood tables, 100 x 133 x 59 cm

In the centre of the gallery six tables display several postcards of national commercial airlines. The depicted airplanes are from different parts of the world and time periods. There are postcards from companies that for one reason or another have ceased to operate, including those from countries that don't exist anymore or have changed their name. On each of the postcards there is a line of pebbles placed side by side. As the original airplanes once did or still do and as the postcards were designed to do, the stones have also been travelling, in a conjunction of a metaphoric travelling and an actual one. The stones have been collected in different locations, during walks taken by the artist or by friends and colleagues who contributed to the collection, building a collective narrative of travel, displacement and people.

The artist has meticulously positioned the stones to cover the aircrafts' windows. All the windows are covered, not letting the passengers look out or the viewers look in. It is the stones that hold the airplane on the table, forcing each of them to stay, preventing them to fly. There is a visual paradox between the physicality of the stones and the postcards, and the nature of the aircrafts they represent. Planes belonging to nations, stones belonging to places, people in between placement and displacement, transcending notions of national belonging by the act of collecting stones everywhere.

OtherWhere

2011

168 postcards and stones, 6 painted wood tables, 100 x 133 x 59 cm

In the centre of the gallery six tables display several postcards of national commercial airlines. The depicted airplanes are from different parts of the world and time periods. There are postcards from companies that for one reason or another have ceased to operate, including those from countries that don't exist anymore or have changed their name. On each of the postcards there is a line of pebbles placed side by side. As the original airplanes once did or still do and as the postcards were designed to do, the stones have also been travelling, in a conjunction of a metaphoric travelling and an actual one. The stones have been collected in different locations, during walks taken by the artist or by friends and colleagues who contributed to the collection, building a collective narrative of travel, displacement and people.

The artist has meticulously positioned the stones to cover the aircrafts' windows. All the windows are covered, not letting the passengers look out or the viewers look in. It is the stones that hold the airplane on the table, forcing each of them to stay, preventing them to fly. There is a visual paradox between the physicality of the stones and the postcards, and the nature of the aircrafts they represent. Planes belonging to nations, stones belonging to places, people in between placement and displacement, transcending notions of national belonging by the act of collecting stones everywhere.

OtherWhere

2011

168 postcards and stones, 6 painted wood tables, 100 x 133 x 59 cm

In the centre of the gallery six tables display several postcards of national commercial airlines. The depicted airplanes are from different parts of the world and time periods. There are postcards from companies that for one reason or another have ceased to operate, including those from countries that don't exist anymore or have changed their name. On each of the postcards there is a line of pebbles placed side by side. As the original airplanes once did or still do and as the postcards were designed to do, the stones have also been travelling, in a conjunction of a metaphoric travelling and an actual one. The stones have been collected in different locations, during walks taken by the artist or by friends and colleagues who contributed to the collection, building a collective narrative of travel, displacement and people.

The artist has meticulously positioned the stones to cover the aircrafts' windows. All the windows are covered, not letting the passengers look out or the viewers look in. It is the stones that hold the airplane on the table, forcing each of them to stay, preventing them to fly. There is a visual paradox between the physicality of the stones and the postcards, and the nature of the aircrafts they represent. Planes belonging to nations, stones belonging to places, people in between placement and displacement, transcending notions of national belonging by the act of collecting stones everywhere.

Even Heroes Grow Old

Installationview

Porcelain Saucers, animal bone, candle, light bulb and metal plate from Parque de la memoria, Buenos Aires. 76,5 x 36 x 1,2 cm

2012

More information is available here (PDF)

Cazador De Crepúsculos (To V.S)

Porcelain Saucers, animal bone, candle, light bulb and metal plate from Parque de la memoria, Buenos Aires. 76,5 x 36 x 1,2 cm

2012

More information is available here (PDF)

Untitled

Ring sizer and red satin

2011

More information is available here (PDF)

Untitled

Letraset on paper, plastic and desert rose. 77,9 x 36 x 1,2 mm

2010-2012

More information is available here (PDF)

Tristes Tropiques

Magnifying glass, 631 seashells from Bordeaux, plastic measuring devices and wooden blocks

765 x 360 x 12 cm

2010-2012

More information is available here (PDF)

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way

2012

Hand painted macaw in plaster, crate and Booth Line poster; Blueprints (sewed sheets of paper covering window) and Heaven Falls (Dia projection loop, microphone and loudspeaker)

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way is a new commission for the 2012 Biennial, composed by three pieces. The starting point was an exchange between the artist and a neighbour in São Paulo who had a statue of a macaw decorating her front yard.

This sculpture has been shipped across the Atlantic to "re-encounter" a similar macaw depicted in a poster from the early XXth century advertising a voyage to Brazil, which the artist had found at the Liverpool's Maritime Museum.

Blueprints extends the narrative, by masking the waterfront view from the Cunard building's window with a paper stand-in for the sea, an ideal blue: calling to mind the necessary fictions within the contexts that the work inhabits.

By the simple gesture of amplifying the sound of a Dia projector, Heaven Falls reinforces the meaning of the objects represented in the slides: a collection of machetes from the American continent.

An object that has been traveling in time assuming different socio-political and symbolic meanings. An offensive object in the least and most offensive ways.

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way

2012

Hand painted macaw in plaster, crate and Booth Line poster; Blueprints (sewed sheets of paper covering window) and Heaven Falls (Dia projection loop, microphone and loudspeaker)

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way is a new commission for the 2012 Biennial, composed by three pieces. The starting point was an exchange between the artist and a neighbour in São Paulo who had a statue of a macaw decorating her front yard.

This sculpture has been shipped across the Atlantic to "re-encounter" a similar macaw depicted in a poster from the early XXth century advertising a voyage to Brazil, which the artist had found at the Liverpool's Maritime Museum.

Blueprints extends the narrative, by masking the waterfront view from the Cunard building's window with a paper stand-in for the sea, an ideal blue: calling to mind the necessary fictions within the contexts that the work inhabits.

By the simple gesture of amplifying the sound of a Dia projector, Heaven Falls reinforces the meaning of the objects represented in the slides: a collection of machetes from the American continent.

An object that has been traveling in time assuming different socio-political and symbolic meanings. An offensive object in the least and most offensive ways.

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way

2012

Hand painted macaw in plaster, crate and Booth Line poster; Blueprints (sewed sheets of paper covering window) and Heaven Falls (Dia projection loop, microphone and loudspeaker)

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way is a new commission for the 2012 Biennial, composed by three pieces. The starting point was an exchange between the artist and a neighbour in São Paulo who had a statue of a macaw decorating her front yard.

This sculpture has been shipped across the Atlantic to "re-encounter" a similar macaw depicted in a poster from the early XXth century advertising a voyage to Brazil, which the artist had found at the Liverpool's Maritime Museum.

Blueprints extends the narrative, by masking the waterfront view from the Cunard building's window with a paper stand-in for the sea, an ideal blue: calling to mind the necessary fictions within the contexts that the work inhabits.

By the simple gesture of amplifying the sound of a Dia projector, Heaven Falls reinforces the meaning of the objects represented in the slides: a collection of machetes from the American continent.

An object that has been traveling in time assuming different socio-political and symbolic meanings. An offensive object in the least and most offensive ways.

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way

2012

Hand painted macaw in plaster, crate and Booth Line poster; Blueprints (sewed sheets of paper covering window) and Heaven Falls (Dia projection loop, microphone and loudspeaker)

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way is a new commission for the 2012 Biennial, composed by three pieces. The starting point was an exchange between the artist and a neighbour in São Paulo who had a statue of a macaw decorating her front yard.

This sculpture has been shipped across the Atlantic to "re-encounter" a similar macaw depicted in a poster from the early XXth century advertising a voyage to Brazil, which the artist had found at the Liverpool's Maritime Museum.

Blueprints extends the narrative, by masking the waterfront view from the Cunard building's window with a paper stand-in for the sea, an ideal blue: calling to mind the necessary fictions within the contexts that the work inhabits.

By the simple gesture of amplifying the sound of a Dia projector, Heaven Falls reinforces the meaning of the objects represented in the slides: a collection of machetes from the American continent.

An object that has been traveling in time assuming different socio-political and symbolic meanings. An offensive object in the least and most offensive ways.

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way

2012

Hand painted macaw in plaster, crate and Booth Line poster; Blueprints (sewed sheets of paper covering window) and Heaven Falls (Dia projection loop, microphone and loudspeaker)

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way is a new commission for the 2012 Biennial, composed by three pieces. The starting point was an exchange between the artist and a neighbour in São Paulo who had a statue of a macaw decorating her front yard.

This sculpture has been shipped across the Atlantic to "re-encounter" a similar macaw depicted in a poster from the early XXth century advertising a voyage to Brazil, which the artist had found at the Liverpool's Maritime Museum.

Blueprints extends the narrative, by masking the waterfront view from the Cunard building's window with a paper stand-in for the sea, an ideal blue: calling to mind the necessary fictions within the contexts that the work inhabits.

By the simple gesture of amplifying the sound of a Dia projector, Heaven Falls reinforces the meaning of the objects represented in the slides: a collection of machetes from the American continent.

An object that has been traveling in time assuming different socio-political and symbolic meanings. An offensive object in the least and most offensive ways.

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way

2012

Hand painted macaw in plaster, crate and Booth Line poster; Blueprints (sewed sheets of paper covering window) and Heaven Falls (Dia projection loop, microphone and loudspeaker)

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way is a new commission for the 2012 Biennial, composed by three pieces. The starting point was an exchange between the artist and a neighbour in São Paulo who had a statue of a macaw decorating her front yard.

This sculpture has been shipped across the Atlantic to "re-encounter" a similar macaw depicted in a poster from the early XXth century advertising a voyage to Brazil, which the artist had found at the Liverpool's Maritime Museum.

Blueprints extends the narrative, by masking the waterfront view from the Cunard building's window with a paper stand-in for the sea, an ideal blue: calling to mind the necessary fictions within the contexts that the work inhabits.

By the simple gesture of amplifying the sound of a Dia projector, Heaven Falls reinforces the meaning of the objects represented in the slides: a collection of machetes from the American continent.

An object that has been traveling in time assuming different socio-political and symbolic meanings. An offensive object in the least and most offensive ways.

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way

2012

Hand painted macaw in plaster, crate and Booth Line poster; Blueprints (sewed sheets of paper covering window) and Heaven Falls (Dia projection loop, microphone and loudspeaker)

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way is a new commission for the 2012 Biennial, composed by three pieces. The starting point was an exchange between the artist and a neighbour in São Paulo who had a statue of a macaw decorating her front yard.

This sculpture has been shipped across the Atlantic to "re-encounter" a similar macaw depicted in a poster from the early XXth century advertising a voyage to Brazil, which the artist had found at the Liverpool's Maritime Museum.

Blueprints extends the narrative, by masking the waterfront view from the Cunard building's window with a paper stand-in for the sea, an ideal blue: calling to mind the necessary fictions within the contexts that the work inhabits.

By the simple gesture of amplifying the sound of a Dia projector, Heaven Falls reinforces the meaning of the objects represented in the slides: a collection of machetes from the American continent.

An object that has been traveling in time assuming different socio-political and symbolic meanings. An offensive object in the least and most offensive ways.

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way

2012

Hand painted macaw in plaster, crate and Booth Line poster; Blueprints (sewed sheets of paper covering window) and Heaven Falls (Dia projection loop, microphone and loudspeaker)

An Offensive Object in the Least Offensive Way is a new commission for the 2012 Biennial, composed by three pieces. The starting point was an exchange between the artist and a neighbour in São Paulo who had a statue of a macaw decorating her front yard.

This sculpture has been shipped across the Atlantic to "re-encounter" a similar macaw depicted in a poster from the early XXth century advertising a voyage to Brazil, which the artist had found at the Liverpool's Maritime Museum.

Blueprints extends the narrative, by masking the waterfront view from the Cunard building's window with a paper stand-in for the sea, an ideal blue: calling to mind the necessary fictions within the contexts that the work inhabits.

By the simple gesture of amplifying the sound of a Dia projector, Heaven Falls reinforces the meaning of the objects represented in the slides: a collection of machetes from the American continent.

An object that has been traveling in time assuming different socio-political and symbolic meanings. An offensive object in the least and most offensive ways.

Are We the People We Are Waiting for?

A reproduction of Jean-Léon Gérôme's painting Bonaparte Before the Sphinx (1868) and the text "Are We the People We Are Waiting for?"

2012

Are We the People We Are Waiting for?

A reproduction of Jean-Léon Gérôme's painting Bonaparte Before the Sphinx (1868) and the text "Are We the People We Are Waiting for?"

2012

Are We the People We Are Waiting for?

A reproduction of Jean-Léon Gérôme's painting Bonaparte Before the Sphinx (1868) and the text "Are We the People We Are Waiting for?"

2012

Crucero del Norte

(1976-2012)

15 exposed Sunprint papers
20 x 30 cm each
Version 1

In the spring of 1976 my father exiled from Argentina. He travelled by bus from Buenos Aires to Rio de Janeiro, where he joined my mother and sister. Together they crossed the Atlantic on an Italian ship.

In October of 2012 I made the same journey, covering the 2700 kilometres between the two cities aboard a Crucero del Norte bus. I carried with me a package of sunlight sensitive paper. Arriving at the bus station in Rio de Janeiro, 45 hours after my depart, I opened the package and let the sunlight hit the papers surface.

Crucero del Norte

(1976-2012)

15 exposed Sunprint papers
20 x 30 cm each
Version 1

In the spring of 1976 my father exiled from Argentina. He travelled by bus from Buenos Aires to Rio de Janeiro, where he joined my mother and sister. Together they crossed the Atlantic on an Italian ship.

In October of 2012 I made the same journey, covering the 2700 kilometres between the two cities aboard a Crucero del Norte bus. I carried with me a package of sunlight sensitive paper. Arriving at the bus station in Rio de Janeiro, 45 hours after my depart, I opened the package and let the sunlight hit the papers surface.

Crucero del Norte

(1976-2012)

15 exposed Sunprint papers
20 x 30 cm each
Version 1

In the spring of 1976 my father exiled from Argentina. He travelled by bus from Buenos Aires to Rio de Janeiro, where he joined my mother and sister. Together they crossed the Atlantic on an Italian ship.

In October of 2012 I made the same journey, covering the 2700 kilometres between the two cities aboard a Crucero del Norte bus. I carried with me a package of sunlight sensitive paper. Arriving at the bus station in Rio de Janeiro, 45 hours after my depart, I opened the package and let the sunlight hit the papers surface.

Crucero del Norte

(1976-2012)

15 exposed Sunprint papers
20 x 30 cm each
Version 1

In the spring of 1976 my father exiled from Argentina. He travelled by bus from Buenos Aires to Rio de Janeiro, where he joined my mother and sister. Together they crossed the Atlantic on an Italian ship.

In October of 2012 I made the same journey, covering the 2700 kilometres between the two cities aboard a Crucero del Norte bus. I carried with me a package of sunlight sensitive paper. Arriving at the bus station in Rio de Janeiro, 45 hours after my depart, I opened the package and let the sunlight hit the papers surface.

Crucero del Norte

(1976-2012)

25 exposed photographic papers
17,8 x 24 cm each
Version 2

In the spring of 1976 my father exiled from Argentina. He travelled by bus from Buenos Aires to Rio de Janeiro, where he joined my mother and sister. Together they crossed the Atlantic on an Italian ship.

In October of 2012 I made the same journey, covering the 2700 kilometres between the two cities aboard a Crucero del Norte bus. I carried with me a package of photographic paper. Arriving at the bus station in Rio de Janeiro, 45 hours after my depart, I opened the package and let the sunlight hit the papers surface.

We Support

Poster version

2008 ongoing -

The work We Support (Poster version: Bergen, London and Stockholm) is based on the single slide projection piece where; on a small miniature screen mimicking a billboard the words We Support are projected. (We Support, 2008). In this case the artist has scanned the "used slides" from different venues where the piece has been exhibited and produced the prints. Depending on the period of time of the exhibited slides the prints have small differences from each other; colour, sharpness, dust and erasure, presenting clear and distinct degrees of discoloration.

We Support

Poster version

2008 ongoing -

The work We Support (Poster version: Bergen, London and Stockholm) is based on the single slide projection piece where; on a small miniature screen mimicking a billboard the words We Support are projected. (We Support, 2008). In this case the artist has scanned the "used slides" from different venues where the piece has been exhibited and produced the prints. Depending on the period of time of the exhibited slides the prints have small differences from each other; colour, sharpness, dust and erasure, presenting clear and distinct degrees of discoloration.

We Support

Poster version

2008 ongoing -

The work We Support (Poster version: Bergen, London and Stockholm) is based on the single slide projection piece where; on a small miniature screen mimicking a billboard the words We Support are projected. (We Support, 2008). In this case the artist has scanned the "used slides" from different venues where the piece has been exhibited and produced the prints. Depending on the period of time of the exhibited slides the prints have small differences from each other; colour, sharpness, dust and erasure, presenting clear and distinct degrees of discoloration.

CV

Runo Lagomarsino

Born 1977, lives and works in São Paulo and Malmö

 

Education

Whitney Independent Study Program, New York 2007-2008

Malmö Art Academy 2001-2003. MA

Academy of Fine Art Valand, Gothenburg 1999-2001. BA

 

Solo Exhibitions

2013

For Each Light a Shadow Ignacio Liprandi Arte Contemporáneo, Buenos Aires

We have everything, but that's all we have Mendes Wood DM, São Paulo

This Thing called the state Oslo Kunstforening, Oslo - Curated by Marienne Hultman

The G in Modernity Stands for Ghosts Mellanrummet, Nils Staerk, Copenhagen

2012

U-Turn, Arteba with Nils Stærk, Buenos Aires

Even Heroes Grow Old Index, The Swedish Contemporary Art Foundation, Stockholm. Curated by Helena Holmberg

2011

OtherWhere - Nils Stærk, Copenhagen

Hay siempre un día mas lejos Galeria Luisa Strina (Espaço projeto), São Paulo

Violent Corners ar/ge kunst Galerie Museum, Bolzano. Curated by Luigi Fassi*

Trans Atlantic Art Statements, Basel*

2010

The G in Modernity Stands For Ghosts Centro de Artes Visuais, Coimbra. Curated by Miguel Amado

Between an Imperial system and a Metric System Present Future, Artissima, Torino

Horizon (Southern Sun Drawing) Zona Maco, Mexico City. Curated by Adriano Pedrosa

Las Casas is Not a Home Elastic, Malmö

2009

Las Casas Is Not A Home Mummery+Schnelle, London

2007

Those who control the past command the future - those who command the future conquer the past Overgaden, Copenhagen. Curated by Tone O Hansen

2006

This is no time for saluting flags Elastic, Malmö

Out of Sight Gallery Verkligheten, Umeå (with Johan Tirén)

Extended Arguments Gallery Box Gothenburg

2005

Extended Arguments Gallery Muu, Helsinki

Där uppgifter saknas beror det på att situationen är oklar Elastic, Malmö

2003

I suppose that sometimes you have to burn the sky Krognoshuset Aura, Lund - Gallery Mors Mössa, Gothenburg

In my dreams europe is always less than a metre Gallery Peep, Malmö

2001

Schengenland. (Histories that nothing are) Båstadsgatan 4, Malmö (with Stewen Cutzner)

Selected Group Exhibitions

2013

Meeting Points 7: Ten thousand wiles and a hundred thousand tricks M HKA, Antwerp, Para Site, Hong Kong and Beirut Art Center, Beirut - Curated by WHW*

Musée Imaginaire as part of Drawing Now, Paris - Curated by Jean de Loisy and Katell Jaffrès

Contra Escambos Palácio das Artes, Belo Horizonte and Espaço Fonte, Recife - A Project by Leandro Cardoso and Beto Shwafaty

Del Buen Salvaje al Conceptual Revolucionario. Mitos y Realidades de America Latina Travesia 4, Madrid - Curated by Pablo León De La Barra

For No Apparent Reason Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid - Curated by Javier Hontoria*

The Nordic Modell ® Malmö Art Museum, Malmö - Curated by Cecilia Widenheim, Kim Einarsson and Stine Hebert*

Nuevos Vínculos Hacienda la Trinidad Parque Cultural - Caracas, Venezuela*

Landscape and the contemporary Romantic Kunstverein Springhornhof, Neuenkirchen - Curated by Bettina Von Dziembowski, Rebecca Partridge and Randi Nygârd*

X-Border Art Biennial Luleâ*

23. AUGUST - 6. OKTOBER Victor, A, Judge William, Johannes (de silentio), Constantin, Vigilius, Nicolaus, Hilarius, Johannes (Climacus), H.H., Anti-Climacus et. Al - Fotografisk Center, Copenhagen*

Spaces of Action Collateral program of The Trienal de Arquitectura 2013, Lisbon - Curated by Maria do Mar Fazenda and Filipa Valladares

Conversation Piece n.b.k Berlin - Curated by Sophie Goltz

The Crisis of Confidence Victoria Art center for contemporary cultural production, Bucarest. Curated by Lino Baldini and Marta Barbieri

Selection of works / touring exhibition from The 30th São Paulo Bienal - The Imminence of Poetics Palácio das Artes, Belo Horizonte

2012

// A man is walking down the street. At a certain moment, he tries to recall something, but the recollection escapes him. Automatically, he slows down Cristina Guerra, Lisbon. Curated by Luiza Teixeira de Freitas and Thom O'Nions

A revolução tem que ser feita pouco a pouco Parte III: Estratificacao e ruptura: O processo como forma and IV: A revolução Galeria Raquel Arnaud, São Paulo. Curated by Jacopo Crivelli Visconti*

The Future that Was Smart Project Space, AmsterdamAn exhibition proposition by Gabriel Lester.

Princípios Flexor Gramatura, São Paulo. Curated by Kiki Mazzucchelli

The way of the worlds Frac Lorraine, Metz. Curated by Beatrice Jones

Fútbol. Arte y Pasión Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey. Curated by Patrick Charpenel y Mauricio Maillé*

Salvajes-Digesting Europe Piece by Piece Traneudstillingen Exhibition Space, Copenhagen. Curated by Guillermo Creus and Aukje Lepoutre Ravn

Show off Malmö Konsthall, Malmö and Point Centre for Contemporary Art, Nicosia Curated by Jacob Fabricius*

Nils Stærk Curated by Nikolaj Stobbe

Iemanjá Claus Mendes Wood, São Paulo and Diana Stigler, Amsterdam

Le Prince des Rayons Galerie VidalCuglietta, Brussels

F for Freedom Galeria Filomena Soares, Lisbon. Curated by Alexandre Melo

Utopraxia TAF / The Art Foundation, Athens. Curated by Evangelia Ledaki

The 30th São Paulo Bienal - The Imminence of Poetics São Paulo. Curated by Luis Pérez-Oramas*

The Unexpected Guest Liverpool Biennal, Liverpool. Curated by Lorenzo Fusi*

Unfinished Journeys The National Museum of Norway, Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo. Curated by Sabrina van der Ley and Andrea Kroksnes*

From the closed world to the infinte universe Le Quartier Centre d'art contemporain de Quimper. Curated by Marc Bembekoff

Posters, Souvenirs and other stuff The Armory Show, New York. Curated by Jacob Fabricius

2011

Encounter with Hill. Selections from the Malmö Art Museum Lunds Konsthall, Lund.
Curated by Åsa Nacking*

Responding To the New Moon: Prologue Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin. Curated by Övül Durmusoglu

Victims and Martyrs Göteborgs Konsthall, Gothenburg. Curated by Anna Johannson*

Landscape and Memory Patrick Heide Contemporary Art, London

Mutual Matters - Konsthall C, Stockholm- . Curated by Kim Einarsson and Petra Bauer

The Walls That Divide Us- ApexArt, New York. Curated by Miguel Amado

A Política do Cotidiano- Itaú Cultural, São Paulo. Curated by Moacir Dos Anjos and Kiki Mazzucchelli

Untitled (12th Istanbul Biennial), 2011 - Istanbul. - Curated by Adriano Pedrosa and Jens Hoffmann*

Speech Matters Danish Pavilion at the 54th Venice Biennale, Venice. Curated by Katerina Gregos*

The Third Sculpture Straat Van Sculpture, Amsterdam. Curated by Krist Gruythuysen

The Crisis of Confidence Prague Biennale 5, Prague. Curated by Lino Baldini and Marta Barbieri*

Guest Nation Brazil... Tudo è Fondazione Pitti, Florence. Curated by Alberto Salvadori and Andrea Lissoni The Future Generation Art Prize @Venice Collateral Event of the 54th Venice Biennale

Tracks New acquisitions in Malmö Art Museums collection Malmö Art Museum, Malmö

Angry The Representation of Radicalisation Netherlands FotoMuseum, Rotterdam

Stories in Between Stiftelsen 3,14 - International Contemporary Art Foundation, Bergen.
Curated by Johan Lundh and Aileen Burns

2010

The Future Generation Art Prize PinchukArtCentre, Kiev*

The Moderna Exhibition 2010 Museum of Modern Art, Stockholm. Curated By Fredrik Liew, Gertrud Sandqvist and Lisa Rosendhal*

In Transition: 2010 CIFO Grants & Commissions Program Exhibition The Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation, Miami*

Land Of Human Rights Poster Campaign. Curated by < rotor >

Monkey See Monkey Do Montehermoso Cultural Center in Vitoria. Curated by Tetriss Produktion*

Notes on Memory IG Bildende Kunst, Vienna. Curated by Sophie Goltz

Vectors of the Possible BAK, Utrecht (with Johan Tirén). Curated by Simon Sheikh*

The Travelling Show Botkyrka Konsthall. Curated by Johan Lundh

Freeze Nils Stærk, Copenhagen. Curated by Caroline Bøge

The Philosophy of Money Lisbon City Museum, Lisbon. Curated by Miguel Amado

All That Is Solid Melts Into Air: The Social at the Berardo Collection Museu Colecção Berardo, Lisbon. Curated by Miguel Amado

The Horizon Line is here (Tornare Per Partire) Umberto di Marino Gallery, Neapel. Curated by Lorenzo Bruni

The Traveling Show Colección Jumex, Mexico City. Curated by Adriano Pedrosa*

Tristes Tropiques The Barber Shop, Lisbon. Curated by Pablo Leon De La Barra

One Shot! Football and Contemporary Art B.P.S.22, Space for Contemporary Creation, Charleroi, Belgium*

2009

Free as Air and Water Cooper Union, New York. Curated by Saskia Bos and Steven Lam

Photography Now: 2009 CFF - Centrum för Fotografi, Stockholm. Curated by Liv Stoltz and Aura Seikkula

Mamõyguara opá mamõ pupé - Panorama da Arte Brasileira Museu De Arte Moderna, São Paulo. Curated by Adriano Pedrosa*

Delocalisation Exit Project Space, Skopje. Curated by Fatos Ustek*

Report on Probability Kunsthalle Basel. Curated by Adam Szymczyk.

Read Thread A Prologue to the 11th International Istanbul Biennale Tanas, Berlin. Curated by WHW*

This is the Score Part II Elastic, Malmö.

Galleri Nova. Zagreb. Curated by WHW.

Miguel Amado Presents ISCP, New York

Risk Luleå Art Biennal Luleå. Curated by Jan-Erik Lundström*

A Space on the Side of the Road Röda Sten, Gothenburg.

Curated by Henrik Andersson and Kajsa Dahlberg

2da Trienal Poli/Gráfica de San Juan: América Latina y el Caribe San Juan. Curated by Adriano Pedrosa, Julieta González and Jens Hoffmann

THIS IS NOT AMERICA El Descanso del Guerrero, San Juan. Curated by Pablo León de La Barra

Changing Light Bulbs In Thin Air Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College New York.

Curated by Summer Guthery

Notes from The Living Dead Museum Living Art Museum, Reykjavik

Posted 4: Private Talk - Public Space Cork (with Johan Tirén)

2008

Between the Images - Imaginable Experiences for Future Memories Exposeptember/ IASPIS, Stockholm. Curated by Petra Bauer, Kim Einarsson and Helena Holmberg*

Ours: Democracy in the Age of Branding New School, Parsons, New York.

Curated by Carin Kuoni*

Salon Of The Revolution HDLU- The House Of Artists, Zagreb.

Curated by Ivana Bago and Antonia Majaca*

Try again, fail again,fail better Mucsarnok Kunsthalle, Budapest. Curated by Hajnalka Somogyi*

no no no no no no no no no no no no there's no limit Signal, Malmö

Annual Report: A Year in Exhibitions The 7Th Gwangju Biennale, Gwangju.

Curated by Okwui Enwezor, Hyunjin Kim and Ranjit Hoskote*

Farewell to Post-Colonialism The Third Guangzhou Triennial Guangdong*

TINA B The Prague Contemporary Art Festival, Prague

AutoStop Malmö Konsthall, Malmö. Curated by Jacob Fabricius*

Art Reclaims Foreign Affairs Ljubiljana. Curated by < rotor >*

Whitney Independent Study Program Exhibition, New York

The unfair fair 1:1projects, Rome. Curated by Cecilia Canziani and Vincent Honoré*Out of Place Cinemateket, Stockholm. Curated by Filmform

2007

Movement, Contingency, Community Gallery27, Kaywon School of Art & Design

Seoul. Curated by Hyunjin Kim*

Hope is a good thing AtelierFrankfurt, Frankfurt. Curated by Borga Kanturk

Ground Lost Galerija Nova, Zagreb and Forum StadtPark, Graz. Curated by WHW

Imagine Action Lisson Gallery, London. Curated by Emily Pethick

Heterotopias Thessaloniki Biennalen, Thessaloniki, Curated Jan-Erik Lundström*

I Want to be Able to See What It Is Lunds konsthall, Lund*

2006

Time Space and Disorientiation Borgovico 33, Como, Curated by Marianna Garin*

Posters for re-making the world Ynkb, Copenhagen

We all laughed at Christopher Columbus Platform Garanti, Istanbul and Stedjlik Museum Bureau,

Amsterdam, Curated by Krist Gruythuysen and November Paynter*

Should I stay or should I go? On Secondary Cities Rum 46, Århus. Curated by Ditte Lyngkær Pedersen, Jee-Eun Kim og Christian Schult

2005

Malmö Art academy 10; th anniversary Rooseum, Malmö*

2004

Minority Report: Challenging Intolerance in Contemporary Denmark Aarhus, (with Johan Tiren). Curated by Trine Rytter Andersen, Kirsten Dufour, Tone O. Nielsen & Anja Raithel*

Galleri Arnstedt och Kullgren, Båstad

2003

Look Into The Future - And Understand Why Iaspisgalleriet, Stockholm, Curated by Jan Christensen

After the future 10 th Biennal of Moving Images Centre for Contemporary Images, Saint-Gervais

Genéve. Curated by Lesley Young and Charles Esche*

Go Liquidacion Total, Madrid, Curated by Elena Tzotzi

2002

Working title:Memory Helsingfors, Trondheim och Copenhagen*

2001

To Accept Folkets Hus, Malmö

 

* Denotes Publication

Bibliography

"Runo Lagomarsino's Against My Ruins", Sophie Golz

"Leaving to Return: 12a Bienal de Cuenca" Adam Kleinman, Mousse Magazine, 2014

"Stilfærdig kunstner udfordrer den geopolitiske dagsorden" Peter Michael Hornung, Politiken, 2014

"ABC- ARTE BRASILEIRA CONTEMPORÂNEA" Cosac Naify, 2014

"Art cities of the future : 21st century avant-gardes" Phaidon Press Limited, 2013

"Three Shows to see" Oliver Basciano, ArtReview.com, 2013

"En el Cono Sur, el pasado se filtra por las grietas" Graciela Mochkofsky, El País

"Sakfrågorna som Försvann" Carolina Söderholm, Sydsvenska Dagbladet, 2012

"Storformat för kulturtipsrundan" Tor Billgren, Sydsvenska Dagbladet, 2012

"Runo Lagomarsino; Index, Stockholm" Matthew Rana, Frieze, 2012

"Future Great 2012: Runo Lagomarsino" Jacob Fabricius, Artreview, 2012

"Läroprocess som Pågår" Frans Josef Petersson, Aftonbladet, 2012

"En bok skriven med objekt" Cecilia Grönberg, Kunstkritik.se, 2012

"Runo Lagomarsino på Index" Axel Andersson, Konsten.net, 2012

"Focus Nordic Countries" Nicola Trezzi, Flashart, 2012

"Critics Picks: Runo Lagomarsino" Daniel Birnbaum, Artforum, 2011

"Runo Lagomarsino" Magnolia de la Garza, Codigo, 2011

"Cyclic History is always a paradox" Gigiotto del Vecchio, Mousse, 2010

"Svindlande resa längs väggen" Thomas Millroth, Sydsvenska Dagbladet, 2010

"Reality Check" Dan Jönsson, 10 Tal nr 01, 2010

"Report on Probability" Quinn Latimer, Frieze, 2009

"Red Thread" Daniel Miller. Frieze, 2009

"Ours: Democracy in the Age of Branding" Miguel Amado, Artforum, 2009

"Runo Lagomarsino at Mummery + Schnelle" M.O. Berger, Sawdustreview, 2009

"Movement, Contingency, Community" Emily Pethick, Untitled, 2008

"Those who control the past command the future - those who command the future conquer the past"

Fred Andersson, OEI, 2007

"We all laughed at Christopher Columbus" Tirdad Zolghadr, Frieze, 2006

"Maskerad Våld" Ann-Charlotte Glasberg Blomqvist Göteborgsposten, 2006

"The Moderna exhibition" Annika Öhrner, 2006

"Lågmält och estetiskt om människor på flykt" Carolina Söderholm, Sydsvenska Dagbladet, 2003

"Konst som utforksar gränser" Linda Fagerström, Helsingborgs Dagblad, 2003

"Bildberättandets återkomst" Pontus Kyander, Sydsvenska Dagbladet, 2003

 

Artists Publication

South Magazine, 2012

Shifter18: Intention, 2012

A Prior-Olivia Plender, 2009

An Ambiguous Case Casco Issues XI, 2009

SHIFTER 13: Indira Sylvia Belissop, 2009

Reality and Visions for Independent Curators, Far Away So Close, 2009

Blind Spot Magazine Issue 39, 2009

Begär och exotism Paletten, 2009

Re/aktion (med Johan Tiren), 2003

Malmö-Oslo 1-0 oVERstation, Passanger, Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo, 2002

Fabrik nr 2.0, 2002

Terezin is like a diamond, 2002

For the vivinity of concord, Sophie Tottie, 2001

 

Works in Collections

The National Museum of Art, Oslo

Guggenheim Museum, New York

Fondazzione Morra Greco, Napoli

Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation, Miami

Moderna Museet, Stockholm

Teixeira de Freitas' Art Collection, Portugal

Guangdong Museum of Art, Guandong

Collection Paulo A. W. Vieira, Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo

Malmö Art Museum, Malmö

Lund City Art Collection, Lund

Sveriges Allmänna Konstförening

Private Collections

 

Awards and Residencies

2012 2 year working grant from The Arts Grants Committee, Sweden

2010 The Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation, Grants & Commissions Program

2009 FAAP, Lutetia Building, São Paulo

2009 Capacete, Rio De Janeiro/São Paulo

2009 Längmanska Kulturfonden

2008 Helge Ax:son Johnsons Stiftelse

2007 KulturKontak Nord

2006 Platform Garanti, Istanbul

2005 Asse & Richard Björklunds fond, Malmo Art Museum

2005 Lunds Konsthalls Vänner 2005

2005 El Basilsico, Buenos Aires

2004 Working grant, The Arts Grants Committee

2004 Nifca, Suomenlinna, Helsinki

2004 Iaspis, Stockholm

2003 Helge Ax:son Johnsons Stiftelse

Contact


Runo Lagomarsino

info@runolagomarsino.com


Nils Stærk

Ny Carlsberg Vej 68
DK-1760 Copenhagen
Denmark
Tel: +45 3254 4562
gallery@nilsstaerk.dk
www.nilsstaerk.dk

Mendes Wood DM

Rua da Consolação 3358
São Paulo, SP, 01416 000
Brazil
Tel +55 11 3081-1735
http://mendeswood.com
info@mendeswood.com

A conversation between Miriam Bäckström, Maria Hedlund, Runo Lagomarsino and Marianna Garin.

Realised in Stockholm on the 16th June 2006. For the exhibition "Time Space and Disorientiation" Borgovico 33, Como.

Runo: The wall drawing Position of Geography, (2003), shows a map of the world that has been reduced and abstracted into a geometrical system. The construction describing what the world looks like and who is responsible for its definition become central issues. And there is the matter of where the middle of the world is placed... the centre of the world.

Miriam: Where is that centre?

Runo: In the points of intersection, in that the lines are not neutral in themselves but are filled with history. For me the viewer's ambivalence is important. The fact that one first sees the drawing as an abstract image and that the construction of the map creeps up on one.

Marianna: When one looks at your works they seem very minimalist, very reduced and rather poetic. Content-wise they seem particularly concrete and rooted in reality and this creates an interesting tension. Can you tell us about how you work and how you use the different abstract elements in your new work Anticipated Discoveries?

Runo: The new work that I am going to show in Como, Anticipated Discoveries, consists of several pictures, maps and collages that are presented in a glass showcase that creates a reference to the world of museums. The starting point for the work is a map of Europe on which a refugee smuggler who works from Sweden has indicated how his operations function on a practical level. I was interested in making people aware of the situation and of opposing the very negative views that surround his work. He describes himself as being part of a modern, unarmed guerrilla movement. What I do in Anticipated Discoveries is to root this in other narratives and in an historical context. His lines refer to the other map, to the lines on the wall drawing. He tries to deconstruct that picture.

Miriam: Though he does not actually do that, in that the geographical map remains there.

Runo: He has to go round the map. He redraws it. He places his map on top of the other one.

Miriam: The map is still geographical, what he does is to deconstruct other systems or exploit other systems. It is usual to combine two worlds because the map is so physical. I was given a book with a world map of feelings that looks completely different, and that is fun to trace. They work together, they communicate with each other. Although they are two different maps, they are united.

Runo: I bring together the map of Europe with other images. I did not want the map to acquire such a powerful 'aura', but rather that one should be able to read it through different historical and political layers, and reinforce this through the combination of actual and fictitious pictures, for example the picture of a fata morgana. In the work I have included a quotation pronounced last year by a director of Christie's in occasion of the sale of the earliest map that bears the word America on it. He spoke of the "venerable geographer", referring to Martin Waldseemuller who drew the map. But this is interesting in relation to the refugee smuggler, for what he is doing is also geography and for me he is a modern geographer.

Miriam: One thing that struck me was that in photography, for example, there are different types of vision. We can only focus on one point and everything else becomes more or less blurred.

Maria: Yes, blurred, but then we make use of other senses that help us.

Runo: The third work is a sculpture where a slide is projected onto a sheet of MDF-board. The work is a model with the character of an advertising billboard. The words on the projection are We all laughed at Christopher Columbus, taken from the song They all laughed at Christopher Columbus that Chet Baker, amongst others, sings. I changed they to we so that the laughing is incorporated into a collective of which I am part. At the same time it is really about something else, a tragic and critical laughter that is about how one interprets the passage of history and how the colonial past is constantly writing the history of today. I have shown the two earlier works (Position of Geography and We all laughed at Christopher Columbus) separately in various contexts, but I work in a way that makes me return to past works that together create a narrative.

Marianna: I would like to talk a bit about how you relate to the aspect of absence in your respective works. There is a sense of abandonment or isolation in Maria's pictures. With Runo one has a feeling of absence of violence in the video Notion of conflict, dance of the piñata, (2004), in which someone wearing a blindfold tries to hit a doll wearing military uniform with a stick. In Histories that nothing are, (2001-2003), there is a man who runs eternally carrying a Molotov cocktail that he never throws. Opposition is represented by the absence of an action and the symbolic language is strengthened. With Miriam it is the absence of people in the photographic series such as Estate of a Deceased Person, (1992-1996), Set Constructions, (1995-2000), or Apartments, (2000-2001). And this inevitably leads me on to the question as to how you work in relation to absence-presence. I have in mind, for example, Maria's images in which people are often merely intimated.

Maria: Indeed, that creates a stronger sense of presence. When something is intimated one has to supply it oneself and this makes the viewer more involved in the work. But for me it is largely a matter of the work being present and not whether there is a person in the picture or not. Rather, it is something else that is important.

Miriam: It is not exactly a way of relating, but rather a possibility for distance. It is difficult to study something or to let someone else study it, if there is another person there wanting attention. But what is presence, is it the other person?

Marianna: As the beholder, you can project a sort of presence into what you are looking at, by means of experiences or identifications that you put into the picture.

Miriam: But for me it is simpler to start such a process when I look at a work if I do not need to conduct a conversation, but I am able to take whatever time I need with the material. I think that one can develop presence-absence into completely different things. I believe it is a matter of questions and answers.

Runo: I think that in relation to the viewer one needs to trust one's own audience. They can add their own ideas - what you call presence - in the context. I think that the audience can fill in things and, with their own time, can take in a work and understand its inherent layers. But in the works that you mention, absence is also a matter of resistance. That absence can be something that is active as in Extended Arguments, (2005), with the boycotted football match.

Maria: I am a bit curious when you mention isolation or abandonment. What do you actually mean? It sounded so sorrowful.

Marianna: This is not the case in all of your works, but I am thinking for example of Deserted ,(2004), with the photographs of dried up houseplants, or in the traces of dirt in At my Home,(1997). In Deserted the plants had been forgotten for a time.

Maria: Yes, that may be true. But since I photographed the plants and made these portraits one could also claim that I took care of them.

Marianna: I agree with you that in your caring actions there is a feeling of both absence and presence. The various everyday elements that one recognizes so well appear as if distorted or displaced.

Maria: The focus on whiteness in the At my Home pictures is equally great. It is a matter of both/and, in which the one gives to the other. It is just like the case of absence and presence that reinforce each other.

Miriam: I thought about other pairs of opposites that are interesting with regard to presence-absence, for example text-image, description-narrative. If one thinks of your glass showcase, Runo, it is a description but it is not a narrative. And the description is more distant, is it not? The narrative, I think, is more presence, more subjective, which gives us another pair of opposites in objective-subjective.

Runo: Though I do not know whether a description is more objective?

Miriam: But this is just a matter of agreements.

Maria: Yes, but surely there are different levels.

Miriam: That is what we all do in our work. We question that arrangement, because just as you have said, it contains both.

Runo: I think that in some way, Anticipated Discoveries is just a description, even if it is in some sense a fiction. I use it as a statement but mix it with something else that simultaneously makes it a narrative.

Miriam: You make use of an objective language even though it is totally subjective, and this creates a tension in the work.

Maria: This is how one creates a power structure and how one makes a map. One maintains that these are fixed norms even though they are actually constructions.

Marianna: It looks like an abstraction though the map is, in a sense, a construction of something extremely concrete, something that represents a political or historical reality. In Position of Geography, for example, the map does not remain a pure abstraction in that it represents a reality, for example through the consequences that people have to live with when new boundaries are drawn up by colonial powers. Or else the drawn line refers to a political geography in which reality can be pulled towards a total abstraction, a removal from reality itself. In this regard how is your relationship to abstraction?

Runo: For me abstraction is a way of communicating these complex issues. By combining abstract elements with political questions the work is charged, exploiting both the subversive and the seductive.

Miriam: Abstraction is, I think, a way of avoiding logical thinking, which is not always as logical as we imagine since it is also a construction. Abstraction can, not always but often, be a useful tool for deconstructing and reconstructing things and thereby achieving something different.

Maria: Like some sort of collage.

Miriam: One does not know where one will end up oneself, but this is a tool we use.

Runo: In earlier works I frequently used graph paper and the ruler. The problem that interested me was about concepts as neutrality, correctness and the norm. The gap between a "universal" instrument that would create "equality" has historically (from colonialism to the Schengen Treaty) always been defined and categorized.

Miriam: Neutrality, correctness and the norm exist as agreements. Abstraction is something else.

Runo: The map is in a sense an abstraction while at the same time it is based on some form of norm; in that sense they are very similar.

Miriam: But abstraction is a very broad concept. If we are going to discuss it we need to establish what it is, to define it more precisely. What, then, is the opposite of abstraction? You have claimed that it is what is concrete but if one applies that to language it can turn into a cliché. The cliché is our least common denominator, the simplest language that we can communicate with, do you not agree? The cliché is very banal. We are all aware of it as a simple linguistic construction, a widely based agreement.

Maria: But is it so widespread? Clichés can exist among groups of people who have an awareness of them.

Miriam: All the pairs of opposites can just as well exchange places depending on the situation, as with the map being both concrete and abstract.

Marianna: Now that we are discussing language can you tell us a bit about how you worked with the film Rebecka? You have mentioned the interview having a form like photography in that it documents a conversation. Can you enlarge on that? What is it that interests you in the interview as a form?

Miriam: It is the same reason that you are holding this conversation. We have an idea or an agreement about a recorded situation in which there are also possibilities of improvisation. Though I wonder whether they really exist. There is an agreement about authenticity, this is happening here and now. But we also know that, when we read the text that you have edited on the basis of this conversation, you will have a particular interest that you want to highlight. And you have the power to do this since someone has to make the decisions about the material, and here there is a similarity with photography. Even if we all recognize and identify what is there, there has to be someone who has a reason for recording the situation. There are several points that are common also to photography but that, at the same time, are something totally different. Interviews can exist in any sort of paper or magazine and this is true also of photography. So it is a relatively open medium to work with and one is not obliged immediately to establish a valuation as to what it is, as with an essay or a novel. If one presents a novel there are expectations about the text. People have a picture of what to expect whereas with an interview the expectations are not as great but people are prepared for just about anything happening in the text. If the interview is interesting one can get very close to the people involved.

Marianna: Another work that appears both in book form and as a sound piece is Anonymous Interviews, (2004), in which interviews with unknown people are read by an actor.

Miriam: I worked with not identifying the people that appear in the text, and not separating them and not giving them names or presenting them, and not even knowing who says what, but letting the text flow. It is reminiscent of a book that Carsten Höller and I produced for the Venice Biennial All images of an Anonymous Person, (2005). Here the chronological order does not exist and one receives very little information as to who has taken the picture of the person. As we were discussing earlier, those who have looked through the book with all the pictures of her taken by different people have come to me and told me who they think she is and they all have very different stories. So in the last analysis this has little to do with her and more to do with the people that look at the pictures of her. Everybody makes their own history. Everyone uses pictures to narrate something about themselves.

Marianna: How did you work on the script for Rebecka?

Miriam: I interviewed Rebecka regularly for six months at the same time that I was interviewing other people for the book Anonymous Interviews for the same exhibition. When I was preparing the manuscript I mixed the conversations with Rebecka, using bits from the 13 interviews that I had recorded. I also asked Rebecka to read the book before we started filming. So in some of the sequences she has chosen to answer from the book. In the finished material I have created people or situations that I think are interesting both in writing in the book and as sound recordings. And so there is material to work with in preparing the script. When, in the film, I say that she should recount a memory she narrates an episode from the book and not from her own memory. When she sits and remembers, she tries to remember things from the text and not from herself.

Marianna: That is exactly what I was wondering about. The fact that although she is narrating a memory that we believe is personal, we know nothing more about how this memory actually affected her life. There is no escape; the viewer is subordinated to her time dimension and to her drama. The only way out would be to learn more about her. When we have seen it all it is as though time has moved on but we still know nothing about her, she remains anonymous. Was the script the result of a collaboration?

Miriam: I wrote the script myself but she could read it before we started filming, so she was a bit prepared but not very familiar with it.

Runo: At certain points in the film one can see that she is reading from the manuscript.

Marianna: Yes, that is what is confusing and it could equally well be part of the construction. In the end we do not know who she is or on what level she moves, though at times it feels as if we are in a private conversation.

Miriam: This has to do with the character of the questions but that is what I also mean by power. The questions make the conversation. At times it can seem that one poses a question and the other person answers in a way that has nothing to do with the question. But the question is still there. Depending on how interesting or how dull or private the questions are, a foundation is laid for the conversation; that is where one directs the conversation. In the script I was trying to get too close to her. For what reason now I do not know. But whom do I get too close to? Is it her as a person or her playing a role? She is there in the form of an actress so that what I get too close to is a construction.

Marianna: If one considers the aspect of authenticity of photography in that it represents a reality, or speaks of what it portrays, in what way do you make use of photography?

Maria: In that it represents an image of something, it is a step towards...

Marianna: If one thinks about the aspect of time what does it mean to work with film as a medium of artistic expression?

Maria: My photographic works contain accumulated time - a movement into the picture. On one level they seem very static but on another level they are not. For me it would have been exciting to change the time axis and to begin thinking in a different way in relationship to time. A way of opening up; a different way of thinking about photography.

Marianna: You are going to show a film and a photographic work that refers to the film.

Maria: Yes. It is a matter of altering how we experience space and time. As though space becomes time. It is a sequence of images that is shown in the room. They could be stills from a film though actually they are photographs. The viewer has to move about the room in order to form an impression.

Miriam: To return to your question. I have never really been that interested in photography but rather in how one can use a photograph and what our habits are with regard to photography. I experience photography as a way of thinking like you, Maria, were discussing. We live in a photographic era and we see and think in terms of photographs. We all have this technology in our thinking since we currently have a common pattern of thinking. So it is very interesting to look at other cultures that do not work with photography but that have other patterns of thought that are central to them and that perhaps relate to a much more abstract understanding of time and place; that have a different approach.

Marianna: How do you work with vision in your most recent work?

Maria: The work consists of a sequence of black & white photographs from an aquarium. They show a tank in which one can see a whale swimming around. One can also see reflections of the people watching the whale and the curved tank can be seen as a sort of eye. In terms of vision there are several levels and displacements. The photographs will have glass in front of them.

Marianna: In the pictures the room seems undefined.

Maria: The mirror images of the people and the whale swap places. Sometimes one can see the whale close to the glass and it becomes a dominant image, almost jumping out of the picture while the people seem to move into the picture. The spatial situation changes. They change positions and the situation becomes undefined.

Marianna: What is the film's recitation about and what is it that interests you in that particular narrative?

Maria: There is a narrator who reads a chapter of Melville's Moby Dick. The chapter is entitled The Whiteness of the Whale. It is a remarkable piece of writing concerned with persuading us that whiteness really represents something evil and not something good as we normally assume. Ishmael, the only survivor of the shipwreck, tells the story though at times the story is taken over by Melville himself. The entire narration is rather obscure. In this chapter one does not know who is telling the story. Whiteness starts to become a matter of evil and the narrative is about changing concepts.

Miriam: What is the language of the voice-over?

Maria: American English which is the language of the book. The Italian version is available on paper at the exhibition. The text is difficult and not readily comprehensible but it is very beautiful.

Marianna: I recently read José Saramago's book Blindness in which he reflects on an imagined epidemic of blindness that spreads around the world. In the Moby Dick chapter there is talk of snow and blindness and how whiteness can cause a person to lose their capacity to see which also happens in Saramago's tale in which blindness is white and dazzling. Blindness has also a symbolic level and this blindness is manifest, in the view of Saramago, in a perverse manner when we humiliate living things, when human dignity is insulted daily by the powerful figures of the world.

Maria: Exactly. At the end of the chapter he talks about snow as the optimal image of evil which can make the beholder blind. The reason that I chose this text from Moby Dick was that I wanted to include a mythological level. The first time that I visited the aquarium the water in the tank was opaquely white and one could not see the whale. And so I had this picture in my head of there being a giant whale in the tank which I could not see but which I had to photograph. Next time I was there, some months later, the water was very different in quality and one could see the whales and they were not very big.

Miriam: Were you disappointed?

Maria: No I was not disappointed for something else happened. It is precisely that one sees something and then one creates a picture of it or a narrative about it and this generates certain expectations which are not fulfilled. Something else happens, something ongoing. I did not know how it would end.

Miriam: But perhaps that was because you allowed yourself not to know.

Marianna: Was the film done in just one occasion?

Maria: The photographs are from my second visit and the film was made during my third visit half a year later and after I had thought a lot about the photographs. On my fourth visit the whales had gone. They were females and they had been taken to an aquarium in Georgia to be inseminated by Russian he-whales. At my fifth visit, only a month ago, I had expected the whales to return with young but there was a sign saying that the whales were not coming back and that the tank was going to be used for seals.

Marianna: Earlier we spoke about the pair of opposites represented by text and picture. You often speak of the gap between subject and image

.

Maria: I have worked on defining size and colour nuances. In the At my Home pictures there is a fixed, formal structure and they have quite large white and clean surfaces so that initially one may not notice the dirt; this grows on one gradually.

Marianna: The size of your pictures is interesting in that one get very close to the objects that you photograph. I am thinking about Descending from Above, (2003), a photograph of some wooden stairs taken from above where the lack of shadows causes the spatial dimension to disappear, and one thinks that one is looking at a floor. But I am also thinking of the extreme close-ups of the checked shirts, which becomes almost three-dimensional.

Maria: With the enlarged details, to return to the At my Home series, it is as though something small grows large, takes up too much space in one's head and becomes irritant. When one has seen a detail in one's everyday existence and becomes really aware of it, it can assume such proportions.

Runo: Yes, the shirt pictures are extremely physical. I saw them at an exhibition in Malmö, as a viewer one could really dress in them. While in another series you took very distanced pictures from the Savannah.

Maria: The small-check shirts are very much about how an everyday object changes when one photographs it. One can see that the photograph shows the back of a shirt but then the pattern takes over and one cannot any longer actually give a name to what one is seeing. It is a matter of breaking up the language.

Miriam: What happens when one does not see anything? Now I ask myself just as much.

Maria: It is transformed and becomes something else.

Miriam: Something that we can all understand.

Marianna: So, by means of the light, for example, you can create these transformations?

Maria: Yes, they can appear in any photographic image. In the most recent of my works they have been very pared down and represent the essence of something - of a photographic image. To me the photograph is so deceitful and manipulative, and on one level I am concerned with that while on another level I am concerned with something else too. If I am to explain how I relate to photography I can state that I find it a very awkward and difficult medium and working with photography is, quite simply, very challenging.

Miriam: At the same time that we know that photographs are extremely subjective they are presented with an aura of objectivity because there are aspects that we all recognize. But photography can easily turn itself inside out if one is not conscious of certain things.

Maria: It is a matter of paying close attention.

Runo: Photographic images have a tendency to be seductive.

Miriam: Something I found interesting was the concept of speculations that Andres Kreuger - whom I am working with at the moment - is very interested in. And I have realized that it is there that my interest in improvisations is to be found. One needs a particular characteristic to speculate because it represents a different way of thinking; that one can test things together or by oneself as one also does in improvisation. To do this one needs to free what one says from what one think. I need to be able to say things that I do not necessarily believe just to be able to speculate, to place myself in different positions. When one conducts interviews by e-mail one is asked a question and then I start to speculate and then I am asked the counter question: do I really believe what I am saying? For then this person is only interested in knowing about my values! But with the way we work one is not interested in the answers and one perhaps does not make a statement either.

Essay & guide - Runo Lagomarsino and Johan Tirén

Those who control the past command the future - those who command the future conquer the past
September 1 - october 21, 2007

Reality Under the Influence: A Guide to the Exhibition

By Tone Olaf Nielsen, Independent Curator


INTENTION & MOTIVATION

Those Who Control the Past Command the Future - Those Who Command the Future Conquer the Past is an exhibition about ideology, or to be more correct, ideology's effect on our perception of reality. Taking its title from a passage in George Orwell's dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, which draws a picture of a future totalitarian society that controls its citizens by means of surveillance, thought control, and rewriting history in order to make the past comply with its view of the world,1 the show examines how ideology structures the way we perceive of ourselves and the surrounding world. In short, how ideology constructs what we know to be reality.To produce an exhibition that examines the notion of ideology at this point in time might strike some as odd. After all, the "collapse of socialism and communism" with the fall of the Berlin Wall and the surrender of more and more socialist and democratic governments to capitalist economics have repeatedly been said to mark "the end of ideology." Capitalism's triumphal progress, initially in the US and Western Europe, and since 1990 around most of the globe, is the result of a natural force "like the weather [...] that comes and goes without any human agency to control it,"2 the argument goes, not the effect of global consent to a particular ideological model. In other words, capitalism is beyond ideology.One could argue, however, that what we have in fact witnessed since the fall of the Berlin wall is a hegemonic shift of ideology from a collectivistic socialist/social democratic conception of society to an individualistic liberal/neoliberal conception of society. The surrender to pro-global market politics, in some countries attended by a gradual dismantling of the welfare state, has been accompanied by fierce culture wars and struggles for the right to determine society's normative values, which testifies to a strong ideology-based politics. Thus, one could claim, as has Gregory Elliot, that our time is a "quintessentially ideological age."3

IDEOLOGY

With this in mind, it might be useful to encircle what the term ideology signifies and how we refer to it in this exhibition. Historically, the concept of ideology has undergone many definitions and remains highly contested.4 Generally regarded as a concept that seeks to explain the relation of ideas to their social context, the term "ideology" was first coined in 1797 by Destutt de Tracy to denote the science of ideas. Fifty years later, Marx and Engels would link the concept to the material base and define ideology as a distorted, false consciousness, which derived from and served to mask the social contradictions in a class society. Thereby legitimating a structure of domination, it could only provide symbolic resolutions to social problems and had to be vanquished by a revolutionary transformation of the social conditions, which had engendered it. Later Marxists theorists removed themselves somewhat from this notion of "false consciousness" and redefined ideology as a system of ideas. Vladimir Lenin, for instance, defined ideology as the political beliefs of a social or economic class (i.e. bourgeois ideology or socialist ideology) and saw socialist ideology as a positive force in the development of a revolutionary consciousness towards a socialist state. Georg Lukács went on to claim that ideologies are not false per se, but false because they impose structural limitations on the classes, whose thoughts they represent. Antonio Gramsci and Louis Althusser would distance themselves even further from the traditional Marxist opposition between ideology and truth/true consciousness and contribute with definitions, which have informed much post-Marxist, structuralist, and poststructuralist theory thereafter. Gramsci introduced the concept of ideological hegemony, which he defined as the dominance and control of one class' ideology throughout society. Seeking to explain how the capitalist class had obtained hegemony, he abandoned traditional Marxist theories of power and claimed that hegemonic control was gained and maintained not solely through the deployment or threat of force in political life, but by manufacturing consent across class divisions in civil society. To Gramsci, no regime could sustain itself primarily through state power and armed force, but had to have broad popular support and legitimacy as well. This manufacture of consent, he argued, took place throughout the social order in institutions, relationships, popular culture, etc., so that an ideological bond between ruler and ruled was created. The subordinate classes would internalize the ideas, forms, morals, and interests of the dominant class and come to see them as "common sense" and the "natural order of things." To Gramsci, the only way to end the hegemony of the ruling capitalist class was to break this ideological bond by establishing a "counter hegemony," which focused equally on structural and ideological change. Only then could the subordinate classes acquire a consciousness that would allow them to question the ruling class' right to rule.

Combining Gramsci's theories with Lacanian psychoanalysis, Althusser theorized ideology as the realm of the "imaginary" and defined it as an eternal system of representation that expresses the lived relation between human beings and their conditions of existence. To Althusser, specific ideologies come and go historically, but the realm of ideology has no history: it is the universal means by which subjects are constituted and individuated as social identities. Gramsci and Althusser would open the door for subsequent definitions of ideology as discourse in structuralist and poststructuralist theory and ideology as a system of signification or representation in post-Marxist and Cultural Studies theory. Common to them all was a rejection of the traditional Marxist opposition between ideology as false consciousness versus the truth/true consciousness on the grounds that "the truth/true consciousness" are themselves discursive. Michel Pêcheux, for instance, examined ideology as the inscriptions of social power in language. Figures associated with the literary journal Tel Quel generated a notion of ideology as the arbitrary, but motivated "closure" of the infinite productivity of language. Michel Foucault would abandon the notion of ideology all together and replace it with his power-knowledge theory, in which he argues that power is created and transferred through an "economy" of discourse where knowledge not only assumes the authority of "the truth" but has the power to make itself true. Knowledge is thus a discursive formation sustaining a regime of truth. Finally, Ernesto Laclau & Chantal Mouffe as well as Stuart Hall have in different ways rejected the close association of ideology with class in order to introduce notions of a plurality and conflict (Lauclau & Mouffe) and identity and difference (Hall) in relation to ideology. As Phillip Hammond writes, "What was needed, after the death of 'that single, singular subject we used to call Socialist Man', was a counter-hegemonic project capable of uniting a plurality of identities and interests, without obliterating 'real differences'."5 Laclau & Mouffe thus define ideology as a field of class-neutral elements, within which there is a struggle to articulate such elements to different hegemonic principles, whereas Hall characterizes it as a system of signification or representation that similarly to language endows phenomena and subjects with significance.

THE EXHIBITION

Informed by all the definitions above, Those Who Control the Past Command the Future - Those Who Command the Future Conquer the Past applies a broad notion of ideology as a process of meaning construction, which a) produces a re-presentation of the world and an interpretation of the existing social order, b) presents a model for what is a "good" society, and c) offers an account of the means through political and thereby social change is produced. Divided into three sections, the exhibition presents seven recent works by artists Runo Lagomarsino and Johan Tirén, who for the past decade, both together and individually, have been working with art that takes a focus on current power structures and the historical, ideological, political, and social constructions that sustain them.

In the first part of the exhibition, Tirén presents two projects, which in different ways address the ideological premises for Europe's recent move far to the right in the political spectrum. In the second part of the show, four works by Lagomarsino put this move into a discursive and historical perspective. The last part of the exhibition presents a collective work by the two artists, which reflects on the possibilities of establishing a future "counter hegemony."Common to all the works is their attempt to encircle the moment, when ideology deconstructs; when ideology in a Derridian sense reveals itself as a mere "supplement" for the fundamental absence of any reality or truth outside of it on which to justify its continued operation. Ideology is disclosed as a mere linguistic construct, devoid of any meaning outside of the system of relationships in which it exists.6 With this encirclement, Those Who Control the Past Command the Future - Those Who Command the Future Conquer the Past exposes tiny cracks in the system from where to act resistantly.

The first work to encounter the viewer is Tirén's large-scale video installation We're saying what you're thinking. Produced in 2005/2007, the work is a critical examination of the ideology, history, and strategies of Sverigedemokraterna (The Sweden Democrats), an ultranationalist and xenophobic political party that received wide support in Southern Sweden during the 2006 Swedish election. The work consists of three video interviews projected onto three large freestanding screens, in which the artist discusses the ideologies and growth of the Sweden Democrats with the party's former secretary, Jan Milld, the party's former press officer, Jonas Åkerlund, and the journalist Daniel Poohl, who for years has been devoted to the study of right-wing movements in Sweden.In the work, Tirén applies a deconstructive methodology. Rather than aggressively interrogating the Sweden Democrats in a manner similar to that used by the political opposition and mass media in general, the artist takes his point of departure in a close reading of the party's program, which he asks the party members to expand on. As such, the interviews become courteous conversations that provide the party members the rare opportunity to express their vision of the ideal society and its realization in full. However, as the interviews progress, inconsistencies and contradictions in the party's ideology are slowly teased out by Tirén's method of inquiry. Key concepts like "nation," "culture," "Swedishness," and "normality" emerge as nothing more than representations without an original source or verifiable external reality on which to justify them. The interview with Daniel Poohl serves to analyze these contradictions further and contextualize them ideologically and historically. We're saying what you're thinking becomes a testimony to the general political development in Europe, where extreme right-wing parties are gaining increasing influence at the parliamentary level and have succeeded in shifting the entire political spectrum far to the right. The work exposes Europe's inability to deal with difference as a result of migration and questions whether it is the response of Europe's established parties to these right-extremist currents that has paved the way for their increasing influence.

Tirén's video installation is surrounded by the poster series Notes in connection with the celebration of a National Day, which he produced earlier this year on the occasion of the Swedish National Day. The series takes its starting point in the politically acceptable and often socially supported nationalism, which manifests itself during celebrations of National Days or national sports events. In the series, Tirén points to the manufacturing of consent described by Gramsci andexamines how ideologically founded values and beliefs connected to the notion of "the nation" and "nationalism" are naturalized so they appear as truths. Juxtaposing idyllically charged imagery with text, the series closely mimics existing discourses and representations known from the social and political field. But by displacing them into the gallery space, Tirén discloses their constructed nature. The series leaves the viewer with a number of questions: What undercurrents do this socially accepted nationalism produce? How do they relate to the nationalism of the extreme right? And where, if at all, do they meet?

With those questions in mind, the viewer is led through a corridor with a title wall before entering the second section of the show, which presents four works by Lagomarsino.

Installed in the center of the space, the first work to meet the viewer is Untitled from 2003. Consisting of one hundred length units drawn by hand on four pieces of metric graph paper, the work is a scathing critique of the metric system as a European compulsory standard by which to measure, administrate, and control land, peoples, goods, and ideas. What appears to be an exact representation of a metric ruler, at closer inspection turns out to be an illustration of the impossibility of any unchanging and uniform measuring device. Neither the individual units nor their total length add up to any known basic unit in the metric system. Furthermore, the hand drawn units are so irregular that their exact length and width can never be determined precisely.With these "imperfections," Lagomarsino critically mocks the metric system's claim to permanence, perfection, and measurability and exposes it as an arbitrary, imaginary construction. The system by which the West continues to colonize land, draw borders, control peoples, and administrate goods turns out to be pure fiction, and no universal grounds for the continued ideological hegemony of the West can be claimed.

To the right of the drawing, Lagomarsino's second contribution is projected: the single-channel video installation Untitled (Extended Arguments) from 2005. Based on documentary footage from the 1973 World Cup qualifying football match between Chile and the Soviet Union, it repeats the goal scored by the Chilenian team during the match. What has caught Lagomarsino's attention in regards to this match is a number of things. Firstly, it took place right after the September 11 military coup, where the democratically elected Marxist President Salvador Allende was deposed, and General Pinochet installed a right-wing military dictatorship that would last for 16 years. Secondly, it took place in the infamous Estado Nacional, a football arena in Chile's capital Santiago, where thousands of political opponents were jailed, tortured, and executed by Pinochet's junta. Lastly, the Chilenian team played against itself, as the Soviet team boycotted the event in protest against Pinochet's regime. With no opponent, the Chilenian team "won" the match.Untitled (Extended Arguments) is a pertinent examination of the rejection and silencing of oppositional voices and the responsibility of fellow citizens towards such silencing. With his continuous looping of the goal, Lagomarsino illustrates the moment when all opposition has been silenced, and democratic deliberation is replaced by totalitarian monologue. Yet, the Chilenian football players play as if nothing has happened, as if their involvement has no consequence. On one level, the work brings to mind the decreasing possibilities for civil disobedience and the unconstitutional incarceration of political prisoners after our September 11 and the subsequent War on Terror. On another, it questions what will be the effects of the shifting of the entire political spectrum to the right. With both left- and right-wing parties claiming the center of the political spectrum in the West, are we too approaching a situation where we have managed to silence ethnic, religious, and political others to get the final word?

Lagomarsino's third contribution to the exhibition is the single-channel video Notion of Conflict, Dance of the Piñata from 2004. Installed behind the representation of the metric ruler, the work explores aspects of oppression and resistance through references to the piñata game. An old Latin American game, where succession of blindfolded, stick-wielding people try to break the papier-mâché piñata figure in order to collect the candy/toys inside of it, the piñata figure has a complex history. It was allegedly brought to Italy from China by Marco Polo and later introduced to Latin America by the European colonizers, where it was used as a pedagogical tool in the "Christianization" of the "natives." Today, the piñata has become part of popular culture and is used to celebrate special occasions such as birthdays and Christmas.In the video, the viewer sees a blindfolded male figure trying to hit a piñata figure shaped as a human body dressed in a military uniform. When he manages to hit, the strokes are brutally violent. After a couple of minutes, the video slowly fades to black, leaving the viewer to ponder what happens after. Shot in black-and-white with no sound, the video brings to mind images and memories of the Latin American 1970s, with its many coup d'états, dictatorships, accounts of torture and killings, and resistant uprisings. However, this history is ideologically contextualized by the appropriation of the piñata figure, which simultaneously points to the era of colonization as the institutionalization of these oppressive forms of violence and the subsequent forms of resistance, cultural translation, and hybridization that were to accompany the de-colonization of Latin America. With these dual references, Notion of Conflict, Dance of the Piñata not only raises important questions about resistance to oppression, but forces us to consider our own position in relation to this.

The sculptural installation Casi Quasi Cinema concludes the second section of the exhibition. Produced in 2006, the installation takes its starting point in Gillo Pontecorvo's renowned film The Battle of Algiers from 1966, which reconstructs the events in Algiers during the Algerian War of Independence against France in the 1950s and is celebrated for its vivid recreation of the colonial war, the anti-colonial resistance, and its organized guerrilla movement.On August 27, 2003, the US Directorate for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict at the Pentagon hosted a screening of Pontecorvo's film to its staff members, considering it to be a useful illustration of the problems faced in Iraq. Casi Quasi Cinema is a fictitious model of the cinema, where Pentagon could potentially have screened the film. The model includes benches and a cinema screen onto which the text of a flyer announcing the screening to Pentagon's staff members is projected. Through his focus on the reception and utilization of The Battle of Algiers, Lagomarsino makes visible the connections between a colonial past and an imperialist present. By appropriating Pentagon's comparison between the Algerian War of Independence and the 2003 Invasion of Iraq, the work not only points to how history is reused and reread over and over again for reasons of power enforcement. More importantly, it forces us to reconsider whether we can indeed claim that the era of colonialism has ended, or whether "Operation Enduring Freedom" (the official name used by the US government for its military response to the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States) is in fact an example of a neo-colonialism in the age of globalization.

Those who Control the Past Command the Future - Those Who Command the Future Conquer the Past is concluded with the joint work Waiting for the demonstration at the wrong time from 2003/2007. Installed in the corridor on the backside of the title wall, this large digital color print features two figures arriving to audio document one of the many EU Summit protests in the newly erected Ørestad area of Copenhagen, when Denmark held the EU Presidency in 2002. However, the landscape is devoid of people and the figures have arrived either too early or too late. With a great deal of humor, Waiting for the demonstration at the wrong time gives an accurate picture of the current possibilities for a "counter hegemony." Faced with the right's claim to the center of the political spectrum and its appropriation of leftist goals, concepts, and terminologies, the left in the West appears disoriented and unable to act. The left's current generations have arrived too late to take part in the 1968 revolts and too early to visualize valid alternatives to the current world order. The question arises whether the left of the West should look South for new ideas and new strategies. There, a new left seems to be emerging, which might just be able to deconstruct current representations of a defeated Western left.

Notes

1. Written in 1948 as a critique against totalitarianism and for democratic socialism, Nineteen Eighty-Four tells the story of Winston Smith and his degradation by the totalitarian state, Oceania, in which he lives. In the year 1984, Oceania is governed by The Party, whose omniscient, omnipresent leader, Big Brother, exerts control over his citizens by means of a number of controlling strategies expressed in party slogans. The title of this exhibition is a slight rewriting of one of these slogans, which in the novel reads: "Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present controls the past." See George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four, 1949, part 3, chapter 2.

2. Quoted from Charles Esche, "Modest proposals or why the choice is limited to 'how the wealth is to be squandered'," in 2nd Berlin Biennale, Oktagon Verlag, Cologne, 2001.

3. Quoted from Gregory Elliott's entry on ideology in A Dictionary of Cultural and Critical Theory, ed. Michael Payne, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers Inc., 1999, p. 256.

4. The following summary of definitions ascribed to the term historically is based on Gregory Elliott's and M.A.R. Habib's entries in A Dictionary of Cultural and Critical Theory, ed. Michael Payne, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers Inc., 1999, pp. 23-26, 252-57 & 226-28, various entries in The Columbia Dictionary of Modern Literary and Cultural Criticism, ed. Joseph Childers & Gary Hentzi, New York: Columbia University Press, 1995, pp. 84-85, 131-32 & 149-51, and Philip Hammond's essay "Cultural Identity and Ideology," in myweb.lsbu.ac.uk/philip-hammond/1999b.html.

5. Hammond, ibid.

6. My use of the term "supplement" is indebted to Pablo Henrik Llambias' essay "A Supplement to the Danish Welfare State" in Trine Rytter Andersen, Kirsten Dufour, Tone O. Nielsen & Anja Raithel (ed.), Minority Report: Challenging Intolerance in Contemporary Art_Station 4: The Book, Aarhus: Aarhus Festival of Contemporary Art 2004, 2004.

CV - RUNO LAGOMARSINO
Runo Lagomarsino was born in 1977 in Lund and holds a BFA from Valand School of Fine Arts (2001) and a MFA from Malmö Art Academy (2003). Working in different mediums such as video, drawing, sculptural objects, and photography, his practice explores how today's political and social environments have developed through different discursive and historical processes, which produce representations and metaphors from which we read and reread history and society. In different ways, Lagomarsino's work analyzes the tensions between universalism as a notion of inclusive humanity and the realities of colonialism and postcolonialism. Lagomarsino's recent exhibitions include: Imagine Action (Lisson Gallery, London, 2007), Heterotopias: 1st Thessaloniki Biennale of Contemporary Art (State Museum of Contemporary Art, Thessaloniki, 2007), I want to be able to see what it is (Lunds Konsthall, Lund, 2007), Ground Lost (Galerija Nova, Zagreb, 2007), and This is no time for saluting flags (Elastic, Malmö, 2006). He lives and works in Malmö

CV - TONE OLAF NIELSEN
Tone Olaf Nielsen is primarily known for her work as an independent curator and transnational, interdisciplinary projects like Democracy When!? Activist Strategizing in Los Angeles (2002) and Minority Report: Challenging Intolerance in Contemporary Denmark (2004). She characterizes her curatorial practice as activist, and her strongly politicized projects explore the possibilities of using the exhibition medium as an activist tool for positive social change. In the spring of 2005, Nielsen joined forces with independent curator Frederikke Hansen and founded the curatorial collective Kuratorisk Aktion, which in 2006 realized the comprehensive exhibition project Rethinking Nordic Colonialism: A Postcolonial Exhibition Project in Five Acts for NIFCA, Nordic Institute for Contemporary Art. Kuratorisk Aktion is engaged in a critical practice along the lines of race, class, gender, and sexuality and merges feminist, queer, and activist informed approaches in order to produce projects that deconstruct white, Western, heterosexual, male privilege within the present world order by raising consciousness on the politics of representation. The collective is presently working on realizing the exhibition projects What's Left of the Left? Rethinking Left-Wing Politics in the Age of Globalization and High Five: Sustainable Development from a Transnational Feminist Perspective. Nielsen currently lives and works in Copenhagen.

CV -- JOHAN TIRÉN
Johan Tirén was born in 1973. From 1998-2003, he attended the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts and holds a MFA from Malmö Art Academy (2004). He works primarily with the medium of video, often using interviews both as a research tool and in the final presentation of the work. Thematically, Tirén's work is concerned with the construction of history and ideology and has involved critical studies of various social issues ranging from asylum policies in Europe to xenophobia and racism in Denmark and Sweden. Tirén's recent exhibitions include: Deep Search (Göteborgs Konsthall, Gothenburg, 2006), Out of sight (Verkligheten, Umeå, 2006), We're saying what you're thinking (Manifestations of creative dissent) (Lund's City Hall, 2006), Landscape (Studio 44, Stockholm, 2006), Contribution to an archive (SKISS, Nynäshamn, 2005-06), and Malmö Art Academy 10 years (Rooseum, Malmö, 2005). He lives and works in Stockholm.

Thanks to Elastic, Kristina Glaffey, Morten Goll, Frederikke Hansen, Pablo Henrik Llambias, Elisabeth Molin, and Overgaden.The exhibition is realized with financial support from The Danish Arts Council's Committee for International Visual Art, IASPIS - International Artists Studio Program in Sweden, and Nordic Culture Point.

The Future Last Forever

A project initiated by Carlos Motta and Runo Lagomarsino

When thinking about the making of a future, of an idea of futurity, we must think of what kind of historical lenses we shall employ. The future is inevitably tied to the past and it is defined by the present. The past has been created by spectres that have determined the present and manifest as agents of influence. Is there a productive mechanism to free ourselves from this kind of historical determination? What is the role of memory and history in this process? What is the role of artists in imagining a society of the future?

For more information, click here (PDF).

A conversation between Runo Lagomarsino and Carlos Motta

Conducted by e-mail in July 2008 (Malmö - New York) for Whitehotmagazine, New York

Carlos Motta:

...Runo, you recently showed me a film classic, which I hadn't seen but read much about: Fernando Solanas' La Hora de Los Hornos, 1968, a radical Argentinean political documentary and communist manifesto that advocates the construction of a just society, free from the forces of bourgeois neo-colonialism and U.S. imperialism. This major work, very characteristic of the 1960s revolutionary movement is a heartfelt outcry for independence. Solanas and his co-screenwriter Octavio Getino went on to formulate what they called Third Cinema, a radical political film practice that ""speaks for the people" and distanced itself from the commercial pressure of Hollywood and uncompromised attitude of European art films from that time. Solanas and Getino hadn't yet lived the atrocities that would soon take over the continent backed by the United States precisely to stop "communist" tendencies. The dictatorship and its violent effects... The following decades would shatter their socialist dreams. 40 years later Latin America is still a "ruled" by neo-colonialist and "owned" by the U.S.

We are both Latin American (I am from Colombia and you are Argentinean) and we are both doing "political" artwork. Although the context in which we work, seems to me to be very different from 1968. Additionally, I live in the U.S. and you in Sweden. How do you see your work work politically? What's your thought of radical aesthetics?

Runo Lagomarsino:

Argentinean poet Juan Gelmán once wrote: "La memoria es una cajita que revuelvo sin solución" (memory is a little box that I stir without solvent). I was very moved, almost shocked when I watched La Hora de Los Hornos for the first time, because of its radicalism as a film, its positions of resistance, as well as for its capacity of analysing history, your history and my history. What impressed me the most was that many of the issues depicted in the film are still extremely current. Watching the film, I asked myself what is its potential today? What has changed in the Latin American context? What is the contingency between colonialism and contemporary Latin America? How is the extreme development of neo-liberal policies and what is the role of the variety of organizations, people, groups, etc. that have produced resistance to this development? These were my thoughts and questions watching the film, more specifically thoughts and questions watching the film 40 years later, in New York, in the U.S., a country that has been (and still is) so present in Latin America.

U.S. presence in Latin America has been a major concern in many of your works, sometimes very direct like in the work the SOA CYCLE, a work about The School of the Americas, but also in the narrative of your current work in progress The Good Life, which discusses the concept of democracy in Latin America.

We have very different approaches to our artistic practice, even though I think our narratives and positions often are connected. You use a more direct documentary strategy and are mostly working with video and I usually use metaphors, abstractions and fiction as an essential tool for thinking and looking at history and its connection to contemporary life.

Recently, I have been thinking a lot about John Coltrane's song Alabama, in connection to the discussion of what constitutes a political artwork and what we/I mean with radial aesthetics. Coltrane's song was made in response to the bombing of a Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963 that killed four young black girls. This song has been a major influence to my work. It is a song that I constantly go back to and "discuss". The way Coltrane "tells the story," a narrative that includes sorrow, anger, grief, and a distinct ideological position is incredible... as someone wrote in the comments to the youtube.com video: This is the BOMB. At the same time, listening to it today sparks a discussion around translation and history, which in some ways is similar to the questions that you pose about La Hora De Los Hornos and its potential today.

Why have you chosen a documentary strategy as you major tool in your artistic practice? And going back to the quote of Gelmán, how do you relate to the movement between history, memory and the present?

Carlos Motta:

I am interested in the methodological differences that you highlight between your and my approach to making "political" artwork and in the historical example you suggest, namely John Coltrane's, which is a very productive one to illustrate that difference, particularly if you contrast his work to that of Fernando Solanas. The former as you imply is a lyricist, his approach is visceral, emotional, and musical. The latter on the other hand is carefully explosive, hyper-rational and essentially an ideologue.

You are right I have chosen to use a "documentary" strategy perhaps more in line with Solanas, because I am primarily interested in the production and analysis of (political and artistic) discourse. The material I choose to work with, in the case of a work like The Good Life, is precisely other people's discourse as articulated in their responses, opinions, political perspectives and personal stories. It is indispensable to me that this content, which I gather on the streets by means of interviewing, is presented as "a document" of that interaction. The political dimension of this work to me lies in the accumulation of these voices, which together may shed some light on the construction (subjective or otherwise) of complex concepts such as democracy, leadership or governance to name a few.

I see the work of memory as a work in the present tense. Historical events, no matter how atrocious, remain buried behind our eyes unless they are spoken about, unless they are constantly re-articulated and re-told. I see my role as an artist in that respect as kind of stirrer of other people's memories to produce current stories, discourses that may instruct to us about the (political) faults of the past.

Most of your works depart from specific events, but often you prefer not to make them public, choosing sentences, words and other elements to stand-in for the events. For example in your work Geometry of Hope, 2007 a provocative sentence that reads:

If you don't know what the south is
It's simply because you are form the north.

You confront the viewers making them reflect about their geographic origin and consider the implications of their oblivion (if your are from the north) or their subjection (if your are from the south). What is your personal relationship to history? How has history shaped your involvement with it?

Runo Lagomarsino:

I believe that the connection to history in my work is often fractured by a number of presences. It is not only "me" who tries to speak through and together with the work, but also an increasing number of voices that are deeply silent or loudly engaged with each other through my work. Different layers in my work are often linked to each other forming specific conceptual maps and arenas. Some of them are systematically and powerfully clear. They pose questions about an unequal world order, about the legacy of colonialism, about the category of "race" and the dynamics of racism. Others are ambiguous and subtle in their level of abstraction, demanding the mediation of analytical categories that provide keys to un-code forms of domination that we are subjected to.

Or to say it differently: The tension between universalism as a notion of inclusiveness and the realities of colonialism and post-colonialism. For example in the work Anticipated Discoveries, 2006 the starting point was an interview that I conducted with a refugee smuggler, a coyote. Simply, his work is to challenge the ways maps and nations have been constructed and regulated. He aid people to cross the borders. For me it was important to reverse the sceptical view that many people have of his work. Today's increasing racism in Europe and the closing of borders makes his work even more needed. But it was also important to connect his work historically and conceptually to other historical geographers and to other narratives. That's why in my piece I created a link between the coyote's mapping and Amerigo Vespucio's. Arguing that his work (the coyote's) can be read as a form of contemporary geography in the legacy of historical geographers.

Near my current work desk I have a reproduction of Goya's The Disasters of War and a picture of Las Madres de la Plaza de Mayo (The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo) in Buenos Aires. Las Madres have been very important in the public political life of Argentina, in times of silence they have spoken and managed to provide a counter narrative to the military junta. You have been researching the concept of democracy and its development in today's Latin America, how do you relate this to the different political and social movements of the 1970s?

Carlos Motta:

Las Madres de la Plaza de Mayo's 30-year + fight for justice and resistance to the atrocious fate of their sons in the hands of the military in the 1970s is an inspiring example of the kind of oppositional groups that have been born from the countless violations of human and civil rights in Latin America. A similar organization is SOA Watch, which under the visionary guidance of Father Roy Bourgeois have consistently opposed the teaching of torture to Latin American military at the School of The Americas in Ft. Benning, GA. Both of these groups (amongst others) have been very influential to my work. In fact I made a video titled Memory of a Protest, 2007 that documents one of the events against the SOA by human rights organization Kamarikun in Santiago de Chile. This work has been described by the press as being "between artistic creation and documentation," which is an accurate description since I am interested in making works that can live a double life; works that can be used as a form of political documents by the organizations that they represent and that may simultaneously contribute to an artistic dialogue within artistic institutions.

This brings me to a sensitive issue within the art world, which is the relationship between art and activism. While I don't consider myself an activist per se, I do think that some of my videos work as works of protest that seek political justice, if they are presented in the right social context. For example Kamarikun has screened Memory of a Protest during several public events. While I didn't quite make the work for them, they use it to present themselves, which is a wonderful accomplishment for me as an artist. Another example is a video program titled The People: Enemies of the State, the Government and the Army, 2005-2008, which openly denounces the violation of civil rights by governmental institutions and the army as well as insurgent groups. I first presented this work in the framework of the exhibition Urban Concerns at the Johannesburg Art Gallery in South Africa in June 2008, a context that seemed very appropriate as Johannesburg faced a wave of attacks on immigrants seeking work in that country. I thought the content of my videos would speak a common language to the museum visitors and perhaps make them reflect on their city's current daily struggle. It is hard to attest whether this was "politically efficacious" or not but I am sure that the larger socio-political context was the right one.

The People... will be screened next at the European Social Forum in Malmö () an event exclusively organized to reflect on political injustice. Within the framework of this event the emphasis will be on the exposition of content rather than on the articulation of form or narration.

To finish our conversation I would like to hear your thoughts about this issue that is of so much concern to politically engaged artists. Do you think your work is politically effective? How do you contextualize your work for it to be so? Is this even a relevant question for you today?

Runo Lagomarsino:

I agree, the relationship between art and activism is sensitive for many reasons. First, I think is due to the idea that the "art world" (or parts of it) has of the activist scene. Personally, I have always thought that activism is extremely boring. Its politics of everyday life; going to meetings, pasting posters, fighting against the monopolisation of public squares and hiding illegal immigrants in your apartment, etc. Don't get me wrong, these are the very reasons that make this work be extremely important and I respect it deeply. My criticism is more about the interpretation and the narration of activism in the context of art. I often find it to be very romantic. For example, thinking within the Latin American context, it is a movement of interests. First "everybody" was quoting Sub-comandante Marcos and the EZLN, some years later the interest moved on to the Asambleas of Buenos Aires, and now? What is the point of engagement and investigation now?

At the same time I find it important when an artist or his/her work can have a double life, as you call it, or in a sense seeing his/her work in a more organically, breaking the fixed lines between different disciplines, which is something different to the criticism that I was raise here.

I don't find my work activist, or effective but that has never been my goal. I see my work as a different form of thinking through the visual where meanings coincide but at the same time don't create a synthesis. Where the critical angle is in-between the different layers and narratives of the work, and I see these in-betweens as places for political potential. To critically ask and to visualise in which ways we read and re-read history and society is always extremely important. For me fiction creates this possibility, this space for struggle, where the viewers engage from another perspective, a place behind the image. As Derek Walcott eloquently wrote: When one enters language one is confronted by a choice, a choice that contains the political history of the language, the imperial scope of the language and the fact that one either has been oppressed by the language or has had learn to master it. This is why language is not a retreat, not a refuge, not even a place where one makes decisions. It is a place for struggle.

In times when neo-liberalism speaks about an exclusive I, different forms of resistance must create an inclusive We, name the present and dream the future.

Residency Unlimited, interview with Johan Lundh

Runo Lagomarsino was born in Argentina, raised in Sweden and is currently based in Malmö. After studying art at the Academy of Fine Art Valand, Gothenburg and the Malmö Art Academy, he went on to attend the Whitney Independent Study Program in New York. His work focuses on how today's political and social environment has developed through historical processes, and how this creates metaphors and pictures from which we read history and society. The exchange between Runo Lagomarsino and Johan Lundh took place between Malmö, Sao Paulo, and New York City over email in March 2010.

Johan Lundh: I want to begin this exchange by asking about your background. You were born in Sweden by Argentinean parents. However, your name doesn't sound Argentinean, in fact, it sounds more Italian to me. Would you mind shedding some light over your personal history?

Runo Lagomarsino: My last name is Italian, my grandfather was from Genoa, and like many Italian families they immigrated to Argentina during the First World War. Lagomarsino or LAGO/MAR/SI/NO (lake/sea/yes/no). The name has never had this division and meaning  (at least I never heard about), but maybe it is an interesting metaphor for the discussion regarding ones background, its importance and implication of how we read and re-read biography and history. Am I Swedish? SI/NO. Am I Argentinean? SI/NO.

One's personal history is always in a state of flux. Things that before I thought were important I today see as something trivial. Like thinking about my last name as a word game: Do I travel by LAGO or MAR? Do I prefer to swim in LAGO or MAR? Is my political interest in LAGO or MAR?

After my parents were exiled from Argentina, they moved briefly to Spain and then to Sweden. That's my background, but it is also the telling of this background. The memory of, and lack of memory of, this journey, and the dreams and fears it brought with it. It's also the view of Alhambra in Granada when I was a kid. The privilege to have two languages as well as the strange moment of forgetting one of them and being forced to learn it again.

In Swedish 20th century writer Willy Kyrklund's novel Om Godheten ("On Goodness"), the protagonist dies and comes to heaven, where he encounters God. However, God is a crocodile or so it appears. After the shock of meeting God had passed, the protagonist asks him: Why are you a crocodile? God replies: because that's how you see me.

Johan Lundh: This intertwining of historical developments and personal stories seems to be key to understanding your art practice. Several years ago, you made a piece that captures your concern with historical colonial discourse and attributions of identity and language, We all laughed at Christopher Columbus (2003). The work consists of a single slide-projection on a small MDF-board. I have found myself coming back to We all laughed... many times, and it also appears to be a seminal artwork for your practice. Would you mind elaborating a bit on it?

Runo Lagomarsino: It is an important piece for my practice. It connected several thoughts that I was dealing with conceptually, politically and visually at the time. The phrase comes from a popular jazz song; the lyric starts with the line "They all laughed..." so I just change "They" to "We" incorporating myself into the work. Whitout really telling so much about whom this "We" is, or why this "We" are laughing at Christopher Columbus. The work was my way of reflecting on the relationship between memory and colonial project that have influence on the way we understand history, society and culture. In what way is contemporary Latin America's status contingent on a colonial history? Another aspect is the emphasis on the connection between language, translation and time, which I think exist in several of my other works as well.

I was and am still trying to develop an aesthetic language that doesn't follow 'mono-lineal narratives,' avoiding the documentary language that so often is used by artists working with theses topics. I was searching for a conceptual and visual framework that moved in and out through these questions, where precise images and poetic gestures became central elements. Letting the work have heterogeneous possibilities and openness for different and contradictory directions. Where ambiguity is linked to poetry and doubt is linked to criticality, and where the viewers may engage in multiple conversations at ones. My aim was to create 'a place behind the image', where things would seem to be slightly ajar.

Johan Lundh: I have a quote written down in my notebook that I have been coming back to again and again. The quote is for art theorist Boris Groys essay The City in the Age of Touristic Reproduction from his book Art Power (2008): "... above all, it is today's artists and intellectuals who are spending most of their time in transit-rushing from one exhibition to the next, from one project to another, from one lecture to the next, or from one local cultural context to another." Over the last few years, you have participated in artist residencies in Argentina, Brazil, Finland, Sweden and Turkey, as well as traveled extensively. How has residencies and travel shaped your work, and do you find it problematic that we all expect to be nomadic as cultural workers?

Runo Lagomarsino: I think there is a difference in the idea of transfer and travel. There is this quote, don't know from whom: "its not so strange that the metaphor 'beautiful as an airport' in never used." First of all, it's the people you meet-friends, colleagues, new friends, new colleagues-that are vital. The moments, the discussions, the walks, the cafés, the bars that I think are the most important part. To move from your own context and see and learn from others, to challenge your view of how things are and should be. Travel as a political space, a space for struggle, is something that I have been interested in for a long time. The idea of places - how they are named and by whom - are central to this creation, a feature that my work mirrors in the historical connections between cartographies of colonialism and cartographies of Diaspora.

I think that different residencies are valuable for different reasons. Some are more focused on production as for example Baltic Art Centre, located in the medieval city of Visby on the island Gotland of the coast of Sweden. Other residencies have been important because of the specific context of their locale. Argentina, in this case Buenos Aires, was significant because it was the first time I traveled to Argentina as a professional, and not just visiting family, it was important as a departure of myself, a movement of the self. Brazil, Sao Paolo and Rio de Janeiro, because the cultural production from the manifest of Antropófago as a alternative postcolonial praxis, to the movements and artistic practice such as Helio Oiticica and Cildo Meireles and  the development of modernism in the architecture of for example Lina Bo Bardi and Oscar Niemeyer has inspired my work in many ways.

To answer the second part of the question, I think there is confusion between the concepts of nomadic and traveling as a cultural worker, I don't think it is really the same. The positions of privileges are very different.  Similar to the romantic notion of activism in some art discourse, I think we over estimate our work as nomadic.

"An individual piece of paper from one of the stacks does not constitute the "piece" itself, but in fact it is a piece. At the same time, the sum of many pieces of the identical paper is the "piece," but no really, because there is no piece, (rather, there) is only an ideal height of endless copies"

I think the way that Gonzalez-Torres "stack pieces" work(s) as traveling and as a metaphor for traveling is an interesting departure and position regarding the complex narratives of belonging and nomadic movements.

Johan Lundh: Speaking of the Baltic Art Centre, you just finished a residency there. This was your second residency in Sweden, the country you grew up in and where you still live. I participated in the same program a couple of years back and found it both interesting and peculiar to do a residency in my native country. How did you find this experience?

Runo Lagomarsino: In relation to the narratives of geography and the idea that there are directions in the world despite the fact that it's a globe, I would like to reply by sending you this short dialogue:

Treebeard: I will leave you at the western borders of the forest. You can make your way north to your homeland from there. [Pippin suddenly looks up with a gleam in his eyes.]

Pippin: Wait! Stop! Stop! [Treebeard comes to a stop.] Turn around. Turn around. Take us south!

Treebeard: South? But that will lead you past Isengard.

Pippin: Yes. Exactly. If we go south we can slip past Saruman unnoticed. The closer we are to danger, the farther we are from harm. It's the last thing he'll expect.

Treebeard: Mmmm. That doesn't make sense to me. But then, you are very small. Perhaps you're right. South it is then. Hold on, little Shirelings. I always like going south. Somehow it feels like going down hill.

(Script from The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, 2002)

In a practical way it was good, I produced a new piece that I have been researching for a while. It has as a starting point the drawings of the marquise in the Ibirapuera Park in Sao Paolo inaugurated in 1954 and designed by Oscar Niemeyer. To me, in this moment in time, to be in a place were there is this focus on production-conceptually and economically-where the institution is flexible and open minded, supports, follows and questions the way a new work is being produced. I found very important, as it can be a very complex situation being in a new place and context producing a new work.

Johan Lundh: Finally, you recently presented one of your largest solo-exhibitions to date, Las Casas is Not a Home (2009/10). It featured both previous and new works and was shown in London and Malmö. It must have been exciting to tease out the connections between different works. I'm curious to hear your thoughts on Las Casas is Not a Home, and what you have planned next?

Runo Lagomarsino: Las Casas is Not a Home is a piece that I have been working on for long time, adding and removing things, almost like the work was an endless notebook. The point of departure for the installation is the Spanish Dominican priest Bartolomé de Las Casas (1486-1566). He was one of the first and fiercest critics of colonialism, who strongly disagreed with Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda on the occasion of the Valladolid debate (1550-1551), which today is acknowledged as a core discussion of the status of indigenous population. The title of the installation plays with the notion of home and placement, using the double meaning of Las Casas-both as a name of the priest and the word for homes in Spanish.

A central aspect and development for the work was the production and inscription of six photographs from the wallpaper preserved in a village restaurant in Ötlingen near Basel, which became a part of the installation. The wallpaper produced in Paris 1820 by Dufour & Leroy, it was named  "Inca Panorama" and it is based on the novel The Incas; or, The Destruction of The Empire of Peru (1777), by the French Enlightenment writer Jean-François Marmontel. This altered version of the wallpaper was first exhibited in Kunsthalle Basel, in the group show Report on Probability (2009), and later as a solo-show at Elastic in Malmö (2010):

"Lagomarsino traces the history of Latin America by means of fragments, making it possible to move backward and forward in time and to overlap individual stories. The arrangements are reminiscent of school or of scientific categorization: Although they suggest learning situations, they nevertheless leave the information to be communicated to the viewer open. The meaning of the things is connected to the direction of rhizomatous readings - from the journeys of conquering to the current political ambitions of Western countries, from modernist forms back to the art of ancient cultures, from the colonization of South America to industrialization, from the current global currency system back to the effects of the cold war.

In the video The G in Modernity Stands for Ghosts (2009), crumpled pieces of paper in a small cardboard box are lit with a match. The balls of paper are blank, undiscovered areas

Lagomarsino cut out of an atlas. The film ends with them carbonizing completely, but, shown as a loop, the action of the burning begins over. The sequence shows a symbolic act of destruction but also of return: the small box becomes an open coffin that holds the terrae incognitae of the world, which are repeatedly ignited anew. The image of smoke and fire is also connected with the manifestations of ghosts, as the title of the film suggests. Lagomarsino's title refers directly to Anibal Quijano's essay "Of Don Quixote and Windmills in Latin America" (2005). Quijano's text contributes to the current debate in South American cultural studies and social sciences, which is an attempt to reflect anew on the impact of modernity on Latin American society. According toQuijano, that society continues to develop under the preconditions of a colonial discourse on power and under the influence of Eurocentrism. In order to find a way of out this labyrinth, "where our unsolved problems haunt us like ghosts from our past," these phenomena have to be brought to light and used to understand historical experiences so that Latin America can develop a new, self-confident identity."

(Excerpt from the text Slow Explosions, on Las Casas Is Not a Home by Simone Neuenschwander, 2010.)

I have just finished a new piece that will be exhibited in Mexico in April with the title Horizon (Southern Sun Drawing). It's a work that consist of almost 100 small drawings where I have covered a thin line in the middle of the paper creating a line which could be interpreted as a horizon. The papers are then put against the sun in the window of my studio for several weeks. As the sun burns, the paper turns yellow except for the covered horizon. As Avi Alpert writes thinking about the work;

Let's start with a question. Is a line what connects two points, or are two points what are formed when we draw a line? When we think of a line as connecting two points, we think of it as making connections. When we think of a line as creating two points, we think of it as making something new exist. Perhaps a line can do both. Let's take an example. On October 12, 1492, Rodrigo de Triana saw a speck of land in the sea. The empty horizon, the never-ending line, suddenly closed in. A map could now be made. A line could now be drawn. From the Canary Islands to the Bahamas, one could run a pen over a map to mark routes of trade, bodies to be thrown to the sea, the outline of the future. But the line does only connect the points: the line makes the points. There is now an "Old World" and a "New World." Without the line of connection, the points themselves do not exist.

 

http://www.residencyunlimited.org/exchanges/writer-in-residence/2010/04/runo-lagomarsino/

Calibán-Revista Latino-americana de Psicanálise

Vol. 10 No.1 2012

Natalia Mirza
Runo Lagomarsino

1.- A principios del siglo pasado, las ideas de Freud fueron decisivas para el surgimiento del surrealismo o el modernismo brasileño. ¿Es el psicoanálisis hoy en día un interlocutor o un estímulo para un artista de tu generación?

Yo creo que el psicoanálisis es (y creo que va a seguir siendo) un interlocutor muy importante en el arte, por el foco en la forma de decir las cosas, en lo que se dice y no se dice, por el sentido que se puede atribuir a los silencios, a los errores y a los malos-entendidos. Creo que la discusión del lenguaje, de la comunicación (o falta de comunicación), del cuestionamiento del ser, y del querer ser otro, de la fantasía, siempre va a ser central para el arte. También creo que hay una confianza en lo inconsciente, los sueños, los pensamientos no totalmente adecuados o delineados. Ser artista es estar en esos límites entre uno y sus otros unos.

Yo estoy respondiendo estas preguntas en español, pero no es mi primer idioma. Yo nací en Suecia, viví la mayor parte de mi vida ahí, mis padres son argentinos. El español no solamente es mi segundo idioma sino en la construcción de mi trabajo como artista a veces es el tercero, después del sueco y el inglés, o después del inglés y el sueco. Y ahora estoy viviendo en São Paulo, Brasil, con otro idioma, otro lugar. ¿Cómo va a ser posible comunicarse, o que yo mismo me entienda y que otros me entiendan, y cómo de una o otra manera lograr traducir todo esto a un lenguaje de arte? Creo que el psicoanálisis puede (me puede) ser parte de esta traducción, de esta narración. Puede ser un interlocutor entre mi y mi, y entre mi y otros y entre otros y artefactos y entre otros y otros. Como dice la canción de Paco Ibáñez Si he perdido la vida, el tiempo, todo lo tiré como un anillo al agua. Si he perdido la voz en la maleza, me queda la palabra.

2. -¿Cuál es el lugar de la tradición en el arte? ¿y cuál el de la invención?

Yo lo trato de pensar así: La forma en que el gato salta sobre la mesa es política. Tal vez el lugar no es la mesa ni el gato, sino el espacio intermedio. O la idea de vivir en el mundo y entremundos, como escribe Walter Mignolo. Creo que lo que yo busco (y espero no encontrar) es justo ese espacio. Pienso que en el arte no hay tradición ni invención, lo que hay es el gato, la mesa, el salto, y lo político y probablemente no en este orden.

Todo lo que empieza como comedia acaba como tragedia. Todo lo que empieza como comedia acaba como tragicomedia. Todo lo que empieza como comedia acaba indefectiblemente como comedia. Todo lo que empieza como comedia acaba como ejercicio criptográfico. Todo lo que empieza como comedia termina como película de terror. Lo que empieza como comedia acaba como marcha triunfal, ¿no? Todo lo que empieza como comedia indefectiblemente acaba como misterio. Todo lo que empieza como comedia acaba como un responso en el vacío. Todo lo que empieza como comedia acaba como monologo cómico, pero ya no nos reímos. (Roberto Bolaño, Los Detectives Salvajes, 1998)

3.-¿Qué pensás de los movimientos artísticos actuales en el mundo y en particular en América Latina? ¿Es posible a tu criterio pensar o hablar de un "arte latinoamericano"?

No sé si hay movimientos tan claramente, talvez el futuro (o los futuros historiadores de arte) lo va a pensar, pero ahora cuando uno está en el momento es muy difícil pensar sobre movimientos. Hay tantas Latinoaméricas, o representaciones de Latinoamérica como hay tantas Europas. Espero que en el momento que "yo" trato de definir el arte latinoamericano, cuando crea que lo puedo atrapar, me dé cuenta que está cambiando, que ya está en otro lado. Nuestros análisis están destinados a fracasar.

Pensemos por un momento: una Latinoamérica viva debería poder desplazarse de su propio eje. El Brasil de Oswald de Andrade era transfronterizo, transcontinental, transamericano (resuena aquí la voz del poeta Haroldo de Campos). Brasil no Brasil. Yídish no yídish. Latinoamérica no Latinoamérica. Transfronterizar Latinoamérica. Un modelo no opresor. (Juan Velentini, Transamérica (2040), 2011)

4.- Tu trabajo ha encontrado una legitimación muy importante en Europa, Usa y otras partes del mundo. Qué pensás que ha encontrado el Otro (de las bienales, las ferias, etc.) en él?

5.- Siendo un artista que tiene un pie en Europa y otro en Latinoamérica, cómo se percibe el arte latinoamericano fuera de aquí?

Mi apellido es italiano, mi abuelo era de Genova, y como muchos italianos migró a Argentina durante la primera guerra mundial, Lagomarsino o lago/mar/si/no. No creo y no se si el apellido se puede dividir así, pero igual puede funcionar como un metáfora para romper (o por lo menos tratar de romper) dicotomías geográficas. Soy sueco? si/no. Soy argentino? si/no. Claro que en varias exposiciones, textos etc. adentro de la producción del arte se construyen y reproducen clichés sobre una idea de lo que es Latinoamérica y de lo que es un arte latinoamericano. Claramente hay mucha gente que desde sus diferentes lugares en el mundo están desconstruyendo y cuestionando esa forma de escribir Historia.

6.-Cómo concebís la poesía y la provocación, tan presentes en tu trabajo, en relación al arte?

Nunca concebí mi trabajo como provocativo, solo trato de, de una o otra manera, mover artefactos un poco hacia afuera de su sistema (sea ideológico, cotidiano, personal etc.) y reconectarlos en otras lógicas semánticas, creando una narración paralela al sistema.

En el 2010 hice un trabajo que simplemente era un texto en letraset sobre la pared de un museo. Estaba escrito "This wall has no image but it contains geography". Me interesaba la idea del vacío, pero de un vacío cargado de historia y geografía. La narración está en la pared blanca física pero al mismo tiempo incluye su historia previa, otras obras que ya sostuvo, el propio espacio y mi movimiento.

7.-Cómo pensás la palabra y la acción, también tan presentes en tu recorrido artístico?

¿Cómo formularemos el espacio entre la acción y el pensamiento? ¿Entre la imaginación y el movimiento? Entre la relación, la negociación, la frustración. La palabra es la acción y la acción es la palabra, cuando Diego el Cigala, canta no hay una dicotomía entre esas posiciones, cuando el odia, yo odio, cuando el llora yo lloro, y cuando el ama yo amo. Yo lo acompañaría a Granada.

8.-Cómo pensás tu trabajo en relación con los movimientos y cambios sociales?

Mi hermano me contó una vez esta historia sobre un hombre Boliviano que, durante una marcha en su país en apoyo a la nueva constitución, llevaba una bandera norteamericana en su zapato durante la totalidad de la paseata. Estaba realizando una protesta individual dentro de la protesta colectiva. Había una lucha en su zapato. Una lucha silenciosa, una lucha con total contenido y a la misma vez con ningún sentido. A mi me interesa esa posición: entre el zapato y el pie. La imposibilidad siempre fue algo importante para mi trabajo, como dice Fogwill Hay tanto por hacer y, sin embargo, se insiste en componer historias. Yo trato de pensar que la relación (o las muchas diferentes relaciones) tiene que ser muy cercana y a la misma vez distante, como un Boomerang (perdón por la metáfora pésima). Una parte importante para mi es pensar el arte y su relación a la política de otra manera, esta otra manera es algo que vuelvo y vuelvo (otra vez el Boomerang) a pensar, a proyectar, a rechazar, a construir y a trabajar. Una posición donde la criticalidad está detrás de la imágen, entremundos.

9.-Cómo resuenan en tu obra el inconsciente, la locura, la angustia?

Durante muchos años mi trabajo enfocaba varias preguntas relacionadas a geografía, desplazamiento, la construcción de narraciones, la idea de viajes, de lugares, la relación entre tiempos históricos y nuestra contemporaneidad. Mi mirada hacia estas cuestiones, y sus variaciones, establece una posición, un dialogo conceptual, artístico y critico, y hace con que todo estos campos se encuentren y se entrecrucen.

Estos intereses se establecieron en un camino intelectual. Pero recientemente, me estoy dando cuenta que están también muy relacionados a mi historia (mis historias, vivir en diferentes lugares, diferentes lenguajes), y esta todo ahí, presente en los trabajos. A veces es tan fácil de detectar, que no se si reírme o asustarme.

Y esto se actualizó más y más en mí después de "volver" "venir" "ir " a São Paulo, y no solamente al estar en esta ciudad sino al estar en transito, al hacer ese cruce atlántico. Para un lado y para el otro.

Claro que este lugar, (el no lugar, el lugar en plural, el lugar entremundos), también ha sido y sigue siendo una posición creativa, poder traducir. Por ejemplo, uno de mis primeros trabajos importantes: "Una canción de Bola de Nieve" (1997) es un video donde yo pongo la canción Vete de mi en una casetera y simultáneamente la canto en sueco, por sobre el español.

En el trabajo "TransAtlantico" (2010-2011) hice cruzar papeles en blanco sobre un velero por el Atlántico, y los papeles se iban quemando por el Sol durante el cruce desde Sudáfrica hasta Brasil. A mi me interesaba el Atlántico como espacio, con sus varias historias y lecturas, el espacio de la conquista, el colonialismo, el lugar de deseos, esperanzas, transito, pero también el exilio de di mis padres, y ahora el viaje que yo hago varias veces por año, "volviendo al sur" y "volviendo al norte".

Este trabajo es muy importante para mi porque no solo trata de hablar sobre ese espacio sino el trabajo es ese espacio, los dibujos son los que tuvieron la primera experiencia del propio viaje, del propio cruce y de su propia construcción.

Cuando yo era chico en un momento clave familiar pregunté: y yo donde me pongo? Creo que esa idea, del lugar, del no saber donde estar, donde ir, y al mismo tiempo buscar y no querer encontrar ese espacio, es lo que sigue definiendo mi posición de sujeto y mi posición como artista.

10.-Cómo se conjugan la belleza con el horror?

En la música de John Coltrane, en las caras de las películas de Pasolini y en cada coma, punto, palabra y frase de Duras.

11.-Has tenido algún acercamiento al psicoanálisis o a los psicoanalistas?

En la narración de mis padres al llegar a Suecia, ellos se imaginaban un país donde las preguntas de lo inconsciente, de la palabra, la familia, la incapacidad, la angustia, y los sueños eran parte de lo cotidiano, que se discutía así en los cafés, que la política era política en sus varios sentidos; pero los cafés cerraban bien temprano, y servían un café muy amargo. No era como en "Persona" o otras de las películas Bergman. Al contrario, la izquierda lo rechazaba por hacer narraciones sobre la burguesía, y por pensar demasiado en la otra realidad, y no la realidad de las calles.

En los textos de Franz Fanon, especialmente su pensamiento sobre la descolonización, otralidad y psicoanálisis. Oh my body! Make me someone who always enquires!

En mis propias sesiones desde hace menos de un año en São Paulo.

Flic-En-Flac, 2012-03-31

Historias de robo, sentimentalismo y espectros.

Teresa Riccardi

El primer consejo, entre benévolo y amenazador, que se da a menudo al emigrado: el de olvidar completamente el pasado, ya que no puede transportarlo consigo, y de hacer una cruz sobre el y comenzar sin más una nueva vida, quisiera infligir autoritariamente al intruso, percibido como ser espectral, lo que el mismo ha aprendido ya desde hace tiempo a hacerse a si mismo.¹

No es cierto que el pasado no se pueda transportar con uno mismo. En todo caso lo que no se puede es volver al origen. Y sólo por el simple hecho de que uno ha decidido desplazarse o porque, en su contrario involuntario, haya tenido que hacerlo debido a alguna fuerza llamémosla, "fantasmagórica".

Ya sentado y comiéndose un huevo, pensó que el colectivo, en cambio, tomaría su rumbo de siempre para volver al origen como un eterno retorno. Viajaba por una ciudad iluminada por luces amarillas, aquellas que podrían haber dado una luz clandestina a Diamela Eltit, lumpeneando de noche por las calles de Santiago o Buenos Aires. Aunque era solo una verdadera ilusión mantenerlas amarillas, cada vez las veía más frías y nacionales: eran blancas y azules. Le pareció que la responsabilidad ecológica era un slogan publicitario que no viajaba ni recorría las geografías que nunca progresan ya sea en el norte o en el sur. Patente y claro se veía desde la ventana del colectivo en el cual se encontraba, esa noche helada.

No había caso, se había convertido en una persona nostálgica y con poca paciencia. Los años le habían cambiado el carácter, a veces se encontraba atrapado entre la intolerancia (característica que se lo atribuía a la insomnia), la distopía que lo sumergía (esto más bien se lo atribuía al clima) y el desencanto que era algo más general. Pero a pesar de estas mutaciones, que él inteligentemente advertía, la melancolía persistía en su cuerpo y en los objetos que atesoraba, aún, sin que los entendiera más que como las armas materiales de su historia. Si en la calle, él reconocía modernidad, un estigma civilizatorio colonialista, de progreso y distinción frente al bárbaro, era porque en el fondo lo detestaba. Algo que no le impedía, ni evitaba, un tipo de sentimentalismo anarquista que se volvería una práctica de acción directa cada vez que el hombre robara un foquito de luz del museo. Sus actos y pequeños gestos se volvían heroicos en ese contexto.

Sin embargo, cada vez que llevaba a los niños al museo, pensaba si realmente tenía sentido ver los residuos de las vanguardias, atrapados en un anacronismo institucional, desplazado, ahí en esa ciudad boreal. No tenía una respuesta certera, sobretodo porque muchos le gustaban, tanto que hasta imaginó robarse un bronce, El rapto y un cuadrito pequeño, uno de los tajos, del Museo de Bellas Artes, ambos de Lucio Fontana, para regalárselos a una compañera que le interesaban esos elementos de la belleza, la verdad y la superficie que trae el gesto justiciero de perforar una tela, una pintura.

No volvería sobre eso, porque si bien ya había conseguido robarse unos tubos de luz, a modo de prueba, los espectros resurgirían y nada le podía asegurar que esa historia terminara ahí. Pero en su fantasía el oro del sur brillaba e iluminaba sus pasos, le quitaba ese estado abúlico, anestésico, asocial. No solo eso, lo llevaba a inventar. A tramar cómo sería regresar nuevamente al sur.

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1. Max Horkheimer y Theodro Adorno, Dialéctica de la Ilustración, (trad. J.J. Sánchez), Madrid, Trotta, 1994, p. 258

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